Posts Tagged ‘Tuque de Broue’

Prost! It’s Oktoberfest

Posted by Debbie

Thursday, September 21st, 2017
Share

Did you know that Oktoberfest actually starts in the middle to late September and runs through to about the first week of October? It is the world’s largest Oktoberfest in Germany meaning ‘folk fest’, is a beer festival or travelling funfair. The history books stated that Oktoberfest originated in Munich, Germany on the 12th of October in 1810 when Crown Prince Ludwig (later to become King Ludwig I) married Princess Therese of Saxony-Hildburghausen. The citizens of Munich were invited to attend the festivities held on the fields in front of the city gates to celebrate the happy royal event. Since then, it has become an annual festival and celebration accompanied by attractions, fun moments with old and new friends, traditional Volkfest food…..and of course a lot of German beer.

Oktoberfest attendees experience a 16 to 18 day festival loaded with amusement rides, side stalls, games, and most obviously: tons and tons of beer is consumed. In fact, in 2013, a whopping 7.7 million litres of beer were served over the 16 days. You do the math!

It isn’t solely focused on drinking beer. Food is just as important. Festival-goers enjoy traditional foods such as Steckerlfisch (grilled fish on a stick),  Käsespätzle (cheese noodles),  along with Bavarian delicacies like Obatzda (a spicy cheese-butter spread) and Weißwurst (a white sausage).

“It’s a huge fun fair and there are a bunch of food vendors who most often sell roasted chicken and shredded radish. At the beginning of the festival, there’s a huge parade where each brewery gets a float which has their first beer barrels on the back,” recounts Dave Bradly who experienced Oktoberfest and lived in Munich, Germany for 7 years. Dave now resides in Ottawa, Ontario and at this time of the year longs to be hollering “Prost!” with his friends in the beer tents.

Photo credit: InterNations Blog

The Oktoberfest experience

“Prost” is German for “cheers”. Alternatively, you could also say “Zum Wohl” (“To your health”). Oktoberfest visitors like having a toast before drinking, a so-called “Prosit”.

We asked Dave about his favourite parts and memories of Oktoberfest. “It’s beer drinking with your friends in the late summer at a beautiful location. The whole city and country come together to celebrate the beer harvest, production, and tasting. Attendees range from infants to ancients!”

On the first day of Oktoberfest, the decorated floats parade into the large fields where the beer tents are equally decorated and at the strike of noon, the first barrels are ‘cracked’ to start the celebrations.  Beer continues to flow for 18 days….

The scale of Oktoberfest is hard to imagine, Dave explains, “There are usually about 11 breweries and each brewery had a tent which was about the size of a football field. Each ‘Bierzelt’ (beer tent) has a different vibe to the next and even though they’re big name breweries, they still feel local.” The serving staff are dressed in traditional Bavarian dress and are able to carry six heavy 1 litre glasses in one hand each! Dave mentions that, “It’s a neat concept. You can go from tent to tent as you sample the different beers. The tents are filled with benches that you simply grab a spot to sit with your friends or strangers and make many new friends as you go.”

 

Celebrating Oktoberfest Locally

Oktoberfest is now celebrated all around the world. Here’s a handful of local breweries that we think are worth raising a beer stein & shouting out “Prost!”

Four Degrees Brewing Company

Just opened this summer, this craft brewery is located in Smiths Falls, Ontario. With 4 beers on tap, we thought the True North of 7 and True South of 7 would be perfect for Oktoberfest. Named for Highway 7 which runs through Ontario, extending from Quebec to Detroit.

Our Savvy Brew Crew member & Sommelier, David Loan, describes True North of 7 as “a Helles Lager, defined as a mildly sweet, low bitterness Munich-style lager with very little foam and notes of honey. Indeed, it’s slightly sweet. A perfect accompaniment to spicy food, with no bitterness, clean and easy drinking.”

True South of 7 is a red ale and has a little lacy foam on top. David describes it as a beer with “flavours of toasted wheat, caramel, and medium bitterness. Lots of sweet malt notes and light effervescence. It’s refreshing a crisp, and very sessionable!”

Photo credit: Four Degrees Brewing Company

 

 

Calabogie Brewing Co.

An hour’s drive west from Ottawa, this brewery located in the heart of the village of Calabogie three friends and an ‘imported’ brewer, opened the doors to this brewery, which has been so popular, they are expanding their production facility into Kanata this fall.

Calabogie crafts a Kölsch-Style Ale called Front Porch. Did you know that “Kölsch” is an acknowledged regional designation and only two dozen brewers can legally call their beer “Kölsch”? This is why beers like Calabogie’s 4.2% ABV (Alcohol by Volume), 32 IBU (International Bitterness Units) Front Porch are often called Kölsch-styled – to protect the designation (much like French Champagne).  This ale-like lager pours a brilliant yellow with nice aromas of lemon with a slight honey malt note. There’s a good amount of biscuit malt base in the flavour with a complimentary herbal hop note ending with crisp citrus.

Photo credit: Calabogie Brewing Co.

 


Kichesippi Beer

Brand new this summer, Commissariat Old Stock Ale celebrates a milestone birthday for one of Ottawa’s oldest cultural attractions – 100th anniversary of the Bytown Museum. Kichesippi co-owner Paul Meek, explains that the inspiration for this beer “was a style that we feel would have been enjoyed back in 1917.  The Bytown Museum is a gem hidden in plain sight in our city and we hope this beer will help bring some well deserved attention to the museum.”

Commissariat Old Stock Ale is currently available in a limited run at the Kichesippi retail store, and it will also be available at special events at the Museum especially in October when it celebrates its official birthday.

Photo credit: CanadianBeerNews

 

 

 

Tuque de Broue

Does it take a family to make a beer? Founder Nicolas Malboeuf has involved in his entre clan at the brewery…including his mom! Located in Embrum, the beers are unique and are always made with local ingredients.

Tuque Dorée Canadian Pale Ale is a flagship beer is intended to be served very well chilled. It asserts itself as a “Canadian Pale Ale”, a new term that’s still being defined. Think about it as the craft brewer’s answer to Molson Canadian! As the name suggests, this is a clear golden colour. The head is thick and foam, with great retention. There’s a lot of flavour here, lightly bitter, a bit malty, and with a silky mouthfeel. With moderate alcohol (4.5% alcohol by volume), this is a terrific session ale. Overall, a great argument for the Canadian Pale Ale style! Pick up a can at the LCBO or The Beer Store.

Photo credit: The Beer Store

 

 

Waller St. Brewing

It still holds the bragging rights as Ottawa’s smallest brewery.  And despite its size, it doubles as a speak easy too– go see it for yourself!

“Hefeweizen is a German-style wheat ale, unfiltered and cloudy from the suspended yeast. Higher temperature fermentation increases the production of the flavour molecule (called an “ester”) isoamyl acetate, which tastes strongly of bananas. As a beer flavour, it can be challenging for some people. But many people DO love it, as seen by the amount produced these days by craft breweries everywhere”, explains David.

Waller St.’s beer Hideaway Hefe lives up to its name: lager coloured, with light foam. “The banana is strong from the beginning – more like over-ripe banana or even those yellow banana candies we used to get as a kid. There’s some yeasty brioche, here, too, along with cloves and bubble gum. It’s certainly an unusual beer!”, states David.

Photo credit: Beer O’Clock Blogspot

 

 

Local Oktoberfests

 

Beau’s Oktoberfest

Friday, September 22nd and Saturday, September 23rd at Vankleek Hill Fairgrounds.
http://www.beausoktoberfest.ca/  Photo credit: Good Food Revolution

 

Captital Oktoberfest Ottawa

Wednesday, October 4th
A fundraiser for Ottawa Heart Institute organized by the Bier Markt at 156 Sparks Street.

http://donate.ottawaheart.ca/site/PageServer?pagename=2017_Oktoberfest_Home#.WZcKbT6GPIU

Creemore Springs Oktoberfest Ottawa

Thursday, September 28th to Saturday, September 30th at Myers Volkswagen Auto Haus at Clarke Fields Park in Barrhaven.
Beer, food & live music.

http://www.oktoberfestottawa.com

 

And of course…. there is always the epic Kitchener-Waterloo annual 9-day festival from October 6 to 14. Over 700,000 people make the pilgrimage to  Canada’s Greatest Bavarian Festival, which turns out to be the second-largest Oktoberfest in the world…to Munich that is!

The annual Kitchener-Waterloo Oktoberfest

 

The annual 9-day festival has attendance of 700,000 people – now that’s a party! It is billed as Canada’s Greatest Bavarian Festival, and is the second-largest Oktoberfest in the world. This event runs from October 6-14, 2017.

http://www.oktoberfest.ca

 

This article appeared in the Sept/Oct 2017 issue of Ottawa Life Magazine

 

 

Share

It takes a lot of good beer to make great wine!

Posted by David

Thursday, May 18th, 2017
Share

Does it takes a family to make a beer? You’d certainly think so if you visited Embrun, Ontario’s Tuque de Broue! Founder Nicolas Malboeuf has involved the whole clan in his new enterprise. Read all about it in this month’s Beer Backstory.

Tuque de Broue is making approachable, sessionable beers meant to be enjoyed at the lake or cottage. They’re unique and made with local ingredients. We know you’ll enjoy them as much as we do!

 

Open your Savvy Hip Hops & you will find 473 mL cans of…

…in your Quick Picks a 18-pack containing cans of:

Tuque Dorée Canadian Pale Ale
Barbe Blanche White Beer
Gougounes Rousses Red Ale
La Cavalerie d’Houblons IPA
Cabane à Tuques Maple Wheat Beer
Portage Porter

in your Taste Case 2-4 containing even more cans of this assortment!

 

Need more beer?

If you would like additional bottles of any beer featured in Savvy Hip Hops, just call our Savvy Brew Crew & we’ll do our best to arrange a special shipment for you.  Put us on speed dial – Savvy Hip Hops Hotline: 613-SAVVYCO (728-8926) or cheers@savvycompany.ca

Cheers!
Debbie & the Savvy Brew Crew

 

 

Introducing….

Tuque de Broue

by David Loan, Sommelier & member of the Savvy Brew Crew

First, a disclosure: Tuque de Broue founder Nicolas Malboeuf and I used to volunteer as adjudicators at the semi-annual final exams for the Algonquin College Sommelier program. We became good friends as a result. When Debbie mentioned that Nicolas’ new venture, Tuque de Broue, was a future Savvy Hip Hops selection, I jumped at the chance to write about them.

Nicolas is a certified sommelier who worked for many years as a wine rep, selling VQA wine to restaurants and getting it featured in LCBO stores.

 

Family Affair

My first question to him was, “Nicolas, you’re a wine guy! What are you doing making beer?!”

“I’d show up to restaurants with the nicest wines in Ontario,” Nicolas said. “All anyone wanted to talk about was beer!  Craft beer is the new wine my friend. And I wanted a product that would reach the community but that I could produce near my hometown of Embrun in Eastern Ontario. I wasn’t interested in moving my family to Niagara.” Family is important to Nicolas. In fact, his wife Margo (right in photo), sister, mother, aunt, and uncle all work at Tuque de Broue with him.

When we chatted during our interview, Nicolas and Margo were a few days from the birth of their second child. “It’s a family affair,” Nicolas said.  A few days afterwards, little Louis was born!

 

Game Changer

Nicolas’ interest in the industry doesn’t end with his own brewery. “My goal is to have hops and malts grown within 5 kilometres,” he said. “I want to be able to jump in my truck and go have a beer where the grain is grown. We don’t have a micro-malting facility east of Kingston, so I’m talking to our local grain co-op about investing in creating malts.”

He also said he’s working with local farmers to improve their hop sales. “Last fall, we’d get a weekly phone call or farmer dropping by,” Nicolas said. “They go, “Hey, do you want to buy some hops?” and show up with a garbage bag – literally – filled with raw hops. They had no idea of the variety, of how it would affect the beer. Farmers hear that hops are an easy crop to grow and there’s a local market, but we need to collaborate with them so they know what they’re producing and how it will be used. That’s the game changer.

 

Inspirations

By the way, the brewery name is a play on words describing beer foam. It’s like the famous Canadian hat, but on a beer! Talking about his days as a wine rep, Nicolas remembers when the idea of a brewery hit him. “I was sitting with a winemaker at Peller Estates and he said, “It takes a lot of good beer to make great wine”. I knew right then….I wanted to be the dude who makes that beer!”

You’ll want to tip your hat to these easy-drinking beers by Tuque de Broue

~ Savvy Hip Hops Tasting Notes ~

David shares notes about each beer, along with some picks on what to serve
…and some fun recipes too!

 

Tuque Dorée Canadian Pale Ale

This flagship beer is intended to be served very well chilled. It asserts itself as a “Canadian Pale Ale”, a new term that’s still being defined. Think about it as the craft brewer’s answer to Molson Canadian! This measures up at 4.5% alcohol by volume (ABV) and 17 International Bitterness Units (IBU).

Tasting Notes: As the name suggests, this is a clear golden colour. The head is thick and foam, with great retention. There’s a lot of flavour here, lightly bitter, a bit malty, and with a silky mouthfeel. With moderate alcohol, this is a terrific session ale. Overall, a great argument for the Canadian Pale Ale style!

Suggested Food Pairing: Let’s keep it simple: hot dogs, a cheese and cracker plate, or loaded nachos (See recipe, below).

 

Barbe Blanche White Beer

White Beer is typically made with wheat and produced in an unfiltered style. This one is no exception! This is an easy-drinker, at 4.8% ABV.

Tasting Notes: Hazy and with a lot of head, the yeast notes come through big time in keeping with the Belgian Wheat style. There’s some citrus here, too, which might tempt you to add a slice of orange to the glass. A hint of nuttiness and a creamy texture round out a beautiful beer.

Suggested Food Pairing: This would go well with a spicy orange chicken stir fry (recipe below).


Cabane à Tuque Maple Wheat Ale

For every 1800 litres of this beer produced, the brewmaster uses 1000 litres of locally sourced raw maple sap. This measures up with a heady 5% ABV and 11 IBU!

Tasting Notes: The colour of amber syrup, this has a nice, think foam with fine bubbles. The maple is very subtle, and works well with the light bitterness and herbal notes. Our tasting panel loved this unique brew and definitely wanted more!

Suggested Food Pairing: Oven roasted chicken with all the trimmings would be a lovely match to this.

 

Gougounes Rousses Red Ale

The name translates to “Red Flip-flops”, invoking lazy Sundays at the cottage – the perfect place to drink this. I’m a fan of red ales and this one is on my shopping list! It’s listed as a strong beer at 5.8% ABV and 22 IBU.

Tasting Notes: Brilliant copper red with a good, long-lasting head. There’s a a nice roasted grain overtone here, with malty sweetness and bitterness on the finish. This is very well balanced and a pleasure to drink!

Suggested Food Pairing: Try this with some slow-cooked BBQ ribs – the sweet and roasted notes will play well together! (Recipe below.)

 

Cavalerie d’Houblons IPA

Not a hop-bomb, but still flavourful, this lovely IPA clocks in at 5.5 ABV and 40 IBU.

Tasting Notes: Light amber in colour, this has lots of foam and a nice citrusy aroma. There’s a ton of citrus notes to the taste, too, along with a strong hop backbone. This is an easy-drinking, sessionable IPA.

Suggested Food Pairing: The hops and acidity will cut through fatty foods very well, so try it with a thin crust white pizza.

 

Portage Porter

Here’s a complex and balanced porter that would serve well at the end of a meal. 5 ABV and 25 IBU.

Tasting Notes: Pouring a medium brown with a tan foam, this rich porter tastes of chocolate and caramel with a hint of coffee. There is some bitterness on the finish, balancing the sweet notes.

Suggested Food Pairing: Try this with an espresso-chocolate mousse – you won’t be disappointed! (Recipe below.)

 

 

~ Recipes enjoy with the featured Savvy Hip Hops ~


With Tuque Dorée Canadian Pale Ale

Loaded Nachos

Recipe and photo: ThePioneerWoman.com

 

Ingredients

1 Tablespoon Olive Oi
1 whole Yellow Onion, Diced
2 pounds Ground Beef
1/2 teaspoon Chili Powder
1/2 teaspoon Paprika
1/2 teaspoon Cumin
1/4 teaspoon Crushed Red Pepper
1/2 teaspoon Salt
1/2 teaspoon Pepper
1 can (14-5 Ounce) Pinto Beans, Chili Beans, Or Ranch Style Beans
1/2 cup Hot Water
Tortilla Chips
1-1/2 cup Grated Cheddar Cheese
1-1/2 cup Monterey Jack Cheese
6 whole Roma Tomatoes, Diced
1 whole Jalapeno, Diced Finely
1/2 bunch Cilantro Leaves, Chopped
Juice Of 1 Lime
1/2 teaspoon Salt
1 whole Avocado, Pitted and Diced
Sour Cream (optional)

 

Method

In a skillet over medium-high heat, add the olive oil and half the onion. Cook it until starting to soften, then add the ground beef. Cook the meat until it’s totally browned, then drain the fat. Add the chili powder, paprika, cumin, crushed red pepper, salt, and pepper and stir to combine. Add the beans and hot water and stir. Reduce the heat to low and simmer while you prepare the other ingredients.

To make the pico de gallo, combine the other half of the onion with the tomato, jalapeno, cilantro, lime juice, and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Stir it together and set it aside.

To build the nachos, place a layer of tortilla chips on a platter or plate. Top with a layer of the beef/bean mixture, then all but 1/4 cup of the cheddar cheese. Add another layer of chips, another layer of the beef/bean mixture, and the Monterey Jack cheese. Add a final small layer of chips, then a small layer of beef and beans, then a final sprinkling of cheddar.

Microwave in 45 second increments until the cheese is melted and bubbly. (You may also place the platter into a 325 degree oven if it’s heatproof. Just leave it in until the cheese is melted.)

Immediately sprinkle on the diced avocado and plenty of pico de gallo.

Optional: Add dollops of sour cream here and there. Serve immediately!

 

 

With Barbe Blanche White Beer

Spicy Orange Chicken Stir Fry

Recipe and photo: AllRecipes.com

 

Ingredients

1 cup orange juice
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon fresh ginger root, grated
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken thighs, cut into chunks
1 bunch green onions, sliced, white parts and tops separated
1 fresh jalapeno pepper, sliced into rings
1 red bell pepper, cut into 2 inch pieces
1/2 cup sugar snap peas
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons grated orange zest
1 bunch cilantro leaves, for garnish

  

Method

Whisk orange juice, brown sugar, rice vinegar, fish sauce, soy sauce, ginger, and crushed red pepper flakes in a large bowl.

Mix in chicken pieces and toss to evenly coat. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and marinate in the refrigerator for 1 hour.

Remove chicken from refrigerator and drain thoroughly in colander, reserving marinade.

Heat a large non-stick skillet over high heat. Cook and stir chicken for 2 minutes; spoon out any excess liquid. Continue to cook and stir until chicken caramelizes, 6 to 7 minutes. Stir in white portions of green onions, garlic, and orange zest; cook and stir 2 to 3 minutes. Pour in half of reserved marinade. Simmer until reduced and thickened, 3 to 4 minutes.

Stir in jalapeno pepper, bell pepper, and sugar snap peas; cook and stir until vegetables are warmed, about 2 minutes.

Stir in green portions of green onions; cook and stir 1 minute.

Remove from heat. Garnish with cilantro and serve.

 

 

With Gougounes Rousses Red Ale

BBQ Ribs

Recipe and photo: JamieOliver.com

 

Ingredients

Olive oil
2 racks of higher-welfare pork loin back ribs (about 1.6kg)

 

Marinade

1 fresh red chilli
1 thumb-sized piece of ginger
2 cloves of garlic
150 ml unsweetened apple juice
100 ml white wine vinegar
2 heaped tablespoons tomato ketchup
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
100 ml low-salt soy sauce
100 g soft brown sugar

 

Method

Preheat the oven to 200ºC. Preheat your barbecue.

Drizzle a little oil over the ribs, season with sea salt and black pepper and rub all over to coat.

Make the marinade. Deseed and finely chop the chilli, peel and grate the ginger and garlic then place them all in a medium pan along with the apple juice, white wine vinegar, tomato ketchup, mustard, soy sauce and brown sugar. Whisk the ingredients together and place the pan over a medium heat. Stir until the sugar dissolves, then simmer for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened.

Put the ribs in a large roasting pan, brush with the marinade and cover with foil. Cook in the oven for 1 hour 15 minutes, or until the meat pulls away from the bone easily. Baste the ribs with the marinade after 30 minutes. After 1 hour of cooking time remove the foil, baste and cook, uncovered, for the final 15 minutes, basting halfway through.

Once your barbecue is hot, transfer the ribs to it. Cook over a medium-low heat for 5 to 10 minutes. Transfer the ribs to a board and cut them up.

Serve with handfuls of rocket and watercress, if you like.

 

 

With Portage Porter

French Chocolate Espresso Mousse

Recipe and photo: SeriousEats.com

 

Ingredients

6 ounces high-quality chocolate (60-70% cacao is ideal)
1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons whole milk
1 tablespoon instant espresso powder
1 egg yolk
4 egg whites
Pinch cream of tartar
2 tablespoons sugar
1/4 tablespoon salt

 

Method

Find this recipe from above URL & get instructions. 🙂

 

  

Enjoy your Savvy Hip Hops!

Share