Posts Tagged ‘The Brouhaha: Nut Brown Ale’

Homework never tasted this good!

Posted by Katy

Thursday, October 27th, 2016
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The craft beer industry has exploded in Ontario and the rest of Canada. Since 2004 the number of breweries open in Canada has gone from 90 to well over 520 craft breweries and more are opening every day! With this dramatic growth, the industry has demanded specialized & knowledgeable labour; employees who can keep up with the day-to-day operations of running a brewery whether it’s working long hours at the kettle, managing retail operations or pushing cases of beer through the LCBO, The Beer Store and now grocery stores! To help with that demand Niagara College founded Canada’s first Teaching Brewery that offers a practical environment for students to learn.

We’re going back to school….beer school!

Each recipe is brewed by the students at Niagara College Teaching Brewery and they use Brewmaster Jon Downing’s award winning recipes. Pay extra attention to the Beer 101 cans as they will give you additional information so you too can become an A+ beer student.

We featured these craft beers in our Savvy Hip Hops:

Quick Picks…

Butler’s Bitter
Pale Ale – Beer 101
Lager – Beer 101
IPA – Beer 101
Wheat – Beer 101
Stout
Cherry Pilsner

Taste Case…

more bottles from the above assortment in the Quick Picks PLUS Helles Lager

Need more beer?

Want to do more ‘school work’? If you would like additional bottles of any beer featured in Savvy Hip Hops, just call us & we’ll do our best to arrange a special shipment for you. 613-SAVVYCO (728-8926) or cheers@savvycompany.ca
Cheers! Debbie & the Savvy Brew Crew

 

 

Introducing…

Niagara College Teaching Brewery
by Katy Watts, Cicerone & member of the Savvy Brew Crew

Back to School

Jon Downing has had a life full of beer. It started at the young age of 14 with a beer kit bought at a local pharmacy that he brewed with his father. He then got his first job in beer when he was 16 working weekends at the local pub as a cellar-man.

It was on a fateful visit to Canada to see his sister where Jon struck up a conversation with Albert Coutu, owner of the Atlas Hotel in Welland. Coutu wanted to start the first brewpub in Ontario, but didn’t know how to make beer and hadn’t been able to find someone to fill the position of brewmaster. Jon, who was only 23, was well trained and accepted the challenge which would go well beyond brewing beer (photo below of Jon in 1986 brewing at The Atlas Hotel).

The Atlas faced some steep challenges. Not only did legislation need to be changed and created for the brewpub to exist, but consumer’s perception on how beer is made and what it tastes like had to change. That proved to be too much for the Atlas and it was sold in 1989.

 

Becoming a Professor

Niagara College opened the Teaching Winery in 2002 to help prepare students for a career in the rapidly growing Canadian wine industry. Seeing its success and the need for skilled labour in the brewing industry, Jon suggested to create a program for beer. Although not immediately interested, it was hard to ignore the skyrocketing growth in the craft beer sector in Canada. black-and-white-photo

Working closely with the Ontario Craft Brewer’s Association, suppliers and local breweries Jon and College staff created the first program of its kind in Canada. The Teaching Brewery launched in 2010 with 300 applicants for 24 spots.

For Jon, transitioning to a professor brewmaster position wasn’t hard. After working at the Atlas Hotel he went on to open over 100 breweries and brewpubs around the world. More often than not, he would be the one teaching staff and owners how to brew systems and recipes he crafted.

 

Meeting Demand

The Canadian craft beer industry now employs 1 out of every 100 people in Ontario and is responsible for over $70 million in sales. With this stunning growth, Niagara College has had to add a summer session to meet demands from the industry. Jon remarks, “The demand is there because the industry is growing so rapidly.”

It isn’t only the beer that’s award winning, but the program itself has garnered much praise from the industry. “All of our students have gone on to work in the brewery industry at some point,” proudly states Jon. “If not brewing beer directly then they are doing their part to support the industry.”

The Teaching Brewery has been such a success that the program has expanded & replicated to Alberta’s Olds College in 2013.

Oh, and don’t think there isn’t a little competition from the Teaching Winery students. Paired with the Canadian Food and Wine Institute, students of the Teaching Winery and Brewery go head-to-head to see which beverage pairs best with each course. That is homework that I would not mind!

Here’s to Jon & the students at the
Niagara College Teaching Brewery!

 

 

 

– Savvy Hip Hops Tasting Notes –hiphops_large-292x300

Katy shares her notes about each beer, along with her picks on what to serve … and some fun recipes too!

Butler’s Bitter

This 4.4% Alcohol by Volume (ABV) beer has won several accolades including Gold in the Canadian Brewing Awards (2013). The recipe is based on beer that was being brewed in the 1800’s by English brewers in Upper Canada.

Tasting Notes: Those troops were treated well! This bitter is beautiful to look at with a bright caramel colour and a great foamy mocha head that’s bursting with toffee, bready malts and some raisin-y sweetness. There’s a good bitterness in the flavour that’s supported by coffee and bread malt notes. Finishes dry, as it should.

Suggested Food Pairing: For many a Bitter is a comfort beer and comfort food pairs well with it. Serve alongside a roasted chicken that’s been done up in herbs. The caramel and malt flavours of the bitter will work well with the chicken skin all while cleansing the palate so you can enjoy the flavours.

Cherry Pilsner

At the teaching brewery students not only learn from a world-class faculty, but there’s also an on-site hop yard and access to farm fresh produce. This 5.5% ABV Pilsner uses Niagara-grown Montmorency cherries for a unique spin on a classic.

Tasting Notes: This pink-tinged brew has a light aroma of bready malts, tart berries and hop spice. The flavour profile is similar with the Montmorency cherries adding more of a tart contrast.

Suggested Food Pairing: Serve alongside a slice of apple pie for a sweet/sour contrast or with cherry crumble to really amplify those cherry flavours. I’ll leave it up to you to decide if you’d like it à la mode.

Beer 101 – Pale Ale

We are so used to the hopped up American version of Pale Ale that it can be easy to forget about the original English version. In this 5% ABV English-style Pale Ale there’s a true balance between the malt and English-variety hop bitterness.

Tasting Notes: Stemming from the Burton-on-Trent region of England, the hard water produced a refreshing Pale Ale with a good hoppy bite. You can expect amedium bitterness with slight fruity esters and an overall great balance.

Suggested Food Pairing: Go full English with a hearty plate of fish and chips, a wedge of farmhouse cheddar or a slice of bread pudding with a dollop of vanilla sauce.

men-and-brewing

Beer 101 – Lager

This 5% ABV North American Pale Lager has its origins in Southern Germany, but is brewed using Canadian and European ingredients to create the perfect balance.

Tasting Notes: Spicy Bavarian Noble Hops provide bitterness and a delicate aroma to balance the cracker sweetness of two-row Canadian malted barley and specialty German malts.

Suggested Food Pairing: Lager is often misunderstood when
it comes to food pairings. Often served alongside something deep fried, usually without any finesse and in a frosted mug. Try pairing this lager with salmon, the lager will stand up to the light flavours and help scrub off some of the oils off your palate.

Beer 101 – India Pale Ale

Originally brewed with additional hops and higher alcohol for the journey to India during the British reign, this ale was later modified with North American hops when colonization of the new world began.

Tasting Notes: This 6% ABV brew has a medium body and beautiful copper colour. The palate is greeted with a sharp bitterness of pine, citrus and a sweet malt backbone that has a long lasting hoppy finish.

Suggested Food Pairing: I love pairing India Pale Ale’s with salty snacks. Go for a plate of fried chicken or give in to deep fried cheese curds (something my local take away has recentlystarted offering). The salt will help town down the bitterness while the beer will help refresh your palate. 

Beer 101 – Wheat

This 5% ABV white beer or ‘weissbier’ is one of Germany’s most distinctive styles as it’s named after the high volume of wheat malt in the beer (over 50% of the grist).

Tasting Notes: This pale straw coloured brew has a thick, white head that emits wonderful clove spice and fruity yeast ester aromas. The flavour showcases that high percentage of wheat malt with clove and a slight banana character.

Suggested Food Pairing: Be creative with Weissbier, their crisp carbonation and yeast character means they can pair with fresh salads or delicate white fish or hearty sausages and even spicier Mexican fare.

Beer 101 – Stout

Stouts popularity grew out of the craze for Porters in the early 1800’s. As the alcohol strength of Porter’s increased their name changed to ‘Stout Porters’ and eventually to simply Stouts.

Tasting Notes: This 5.5% ABV pitch black Stout smells muchlike a fresh pot of dark roast coffee with a little raisin and grain. More of that roasted barley and coffee is in the flavour with a dark bitter cacao note at the end.

Suggested Food Pairing: A classic pairing is oysters; the malt sweetness meshing with the briny oyster meat. I prefer pairing stout with cheese though and I like to get a little adventurous. I may shy away from those strong smelling blue cheeses, stilton’s and aged cheddars, but when I have a stout I become fearless.

butlers-bitter-pic


– Recipes to enjoy with the featured Savvy Hip Hops –

With Butler’s Bitter…

Beer & Beef Pie

Recipe and Photo: BBC Good Food

butlers-bitter-recipeIngredients

1 onion, chopped
1 celery stick, chopped
2 Tbsp butter
2 Tbsp plain flour
700g stewing beef
1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
2 beef stock cubes
2 springs thyme
540ml Butler’s Bitter
500g plain flour, plus a little extra
250g vegetarian suet
1 egg, beaten
Poppy seeds

 

Method

Heat oven to 160C. Using a flameproof casserole dish with a lid, soften onion and celery in the butter. Stir in the flour until it has disappeared, then stir in the beef and Worcestershire sauce. Crumble in stock cubes and add thyme. Pour over Butler’s Bitter, bring to a simmer, then cover and cook in the oven for 2½ hrs. Remove lid and cook for another 30 mins – this should thicken the sauce nicely.

Increase oven to 200C. For the pastry, whizz the flour, suet and 1 tsp salt in a food processor until there are no suet lumps. Keeping the motor running, dribble in 1 Tbsp water at a time until the pastry starts to come together, then tip onto a lightly floured surface and bring together with your hands.

Roll out half the pastry and use to line a 20-22cm pie dish. Using a slotted spoon, spoon in all of the meat, then pour over some of the sauce until the meat is just coated. Put the rest of the sauce into a saucepan. Roll out the remaining pastry to cover the pie. Trim the edge with a small, sharp knife, then crimp or fork the edges to seal. Make a small heart from cuttings. Brush top of the pie and heart with beaten egg, then dip heart into poppy seeds and stick to top. Bake for 30-40 mins until golden brown and crisp. Reheat sauce and serve with the pie along with some mash and greens.

 

 

beer-pale-ale-recipeWith Beer 101 – Pale Ale…

Southwest Cheese Dip

Recipe and Photo: The Beeroness

Ingredients

8 oz cream cheese
2 cups cheddar cheese, grated (packed)
1 cup mozzarella (packed)
¾ cup Beer 101 – Pale Ale
1 Tbsp cornstarch
½ tsp smoked paprika
½ tsp garlic powder
½ tsp salt
½ tsp pepper
1 cup cooked black beans (rinsed and drained)
1 cup corn kernels
1 cup diced bell pepper
1 small jalapeno, diced
1 avocado, diced
¼ cup cilantro, chopped

 

Method

Preheat oven to 350F. Add the cream cheese, cheddar, mozzarella, beer, cornstarch, smoked paprika, garlic powder, salt and pepper to a blender. Blend until smooth.

Add to a large oven safe bowl, stir in the black beans, corn, bell pepper, and jalapeno. Bake at 350F for 15 minutes or until warmed through. Remove from oven, top with avocado and cilantro, serve warm.

 

With Beer 101 – Lager…

Beer Battered Fish and Chips

Recipe and Photo: Food.com

beer-lager-recipeIngredients

4 cod fish fillets or 4 haddock fillets
6 oz plain flour
1 tsp baking soda
8 oz Beer 101 – Lager
½ lemon, juice
Salt and pepper
Extra flour
3lbs potatoes, peeled & chipped
Cooking fat or oil

 

Method

Heat fat up in a chip pan or automatic deep fat fryer – mine has a chip setting which is 190°C.

Peel the potatoes and cut into chunky sized chips. Rinse and dry thoroughly. Fry chips for about 3 minutes until soft but NOT coloured. Drain and shake well and set to one side.

Put some flour onto a plate. Dredge the fish fillets in the flour thoroughly – this is VERY important; it stops the batter sliding off when fried! Leave the fish fillets in the flour whilst you make the batter.

Put flour, bicarbonate of soda, salt and pepper into a large roomy bowl. Add the beer gradually, stop when you have a thick coating type of batter. Drink any beer that is left! Whisk thoroughly until it is smooth and there are no lumps. Add the lemon juice OR a splash of malt vinegar if desired. Mix thoroughly again.

Adjust deep fat fryer to fish frying temperature of 160°C. Take one fillet of fish at a time and holding it by the tail or thin end (!) swirl it around the batter until well coated – plunge into hot fat immediately.

As soon as it has crisped up and set, add your other fillets one at a time, taking out the first ones as they cook – about 6 to 10 minutes depending on the thickness. Place onto a tray and keep warm in the oven.

Turn up the heat setting to 190°C again and cook your chips until golden and crisp. Serve on plates or newspaper with salt & vinegar!

 

 

Enjoy your Savvy Hip Hops!

 

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No fooling around at this brewery!

Posted by David

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016
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We loved the beers produced by Sarnia’s Refined Fool Brewing Co. when we served them last year. With their ever-changing lineup of unique, flavour-driven brews and quirky labels, we felt YOU deserved a second round! More than just a brewery, Refined Fool is making changes to their community and how Sarnia perceives itself. Read on to read all about it! And enjoy these thirst-quenching, crowd-pleasing beers. They’re big on the “Wow” factor!

Open your Savvy Hip Hops & you will find…

…in your Quick Picks a 7 bottle pack containing:hiphops_large-292x300

-Illiterate Librarians: Grapefruit IPA
-Pouch Envy: Australian Pale Ale (2 bottles)
-Noble Oaf: Rye Saison
-The Brouhaha: Nut Brown Ale
-Murder of Crows: Black IPA
-Ripsnorter: Bourbon Porter

…in your Taste Case there’s 10 bottles of:

  • Illiterate Librarians: Grapefruit IPA (2 bottles)
  • Pouch Envy: Australian Pale Ale (2 bottles)
  • Noble Oaf: Rye Saison
  • Short Pier, Long Walk: Double IPA
  • Mid-Life Spices: Braggot
  • The Brouhaha: Nut Brown Ale
  • Murder of Crows: Black IPA
  • Ripsnorter: Bourbon Porter

 

It is summer! Need more beer?

If you would like additional bottles of any beer featured in Savvy Hip Hops, just call our Savvy Brew Crew & we’ll do our best to arrange a special shipment for you.  Put us on speed dial – Savvy Hip Hops Hotline: 613-SAVVYCO (728-8926) or cheers@savvycompany.ca

Cheers!

Debbie & the Savvy Brew Crew

Sarnia’s game changer
Refined Fool Brewing Co.

by David Loan, Sommelier & member of the Savvy Brew Crew

 

Can beer save a city?

That idea came up more than once while talking to Refined Fool’s Director Nathan Colquhoun. (in photo below)

The brewery he started with friends – “I was very intrigued with the craft beer movement,” he said – has become a cultural centre and a symbol of change in Ontario’s industrial heartland.

Renaissance man

Born and bred in Sarnia, Nathan is well aware that his hometown doesn’t get a lot of respect from the rest of the province. “I grew tired of watching other young people leave Sarnia,” he said. “I wanted to make this a place people want to be.” Within a short time, Nathan, 31, co-founded a design firm, opened a small church, and joined with friends to open Refined Fool. When asked if he’s Sarnia’s “renaissance man”, he laughs. “I don’t know about that,” he said. “I just wanted to expand on the things I care about.”“Now people see what we’re doing here and they’re getting excited. They want to coRefined brewery dudeme back.”

Starting small

When Nathan and nine of his friends decided to open a brewery in 2013, they had limited experience with brewing. They wanted their beer to reflect a philosophy of “putting people over the product” and they embraced their limited production capacity.

“Being a small brewer gives us the ability to be flexible and creative,” Nathan said. “And it allows us to take the time to build relationships, with our suppliers, our customers, and our community.”

Embracing their roots

Since they opened, the Refined Fool Brewery has become a cultural hub in Sarnia, hosting dinners, concerts, art shows, and other events. They’ve offered a new, young energy to the city. “We stopped worrying about the outside perception of Sarnia,” Nathan said. “Our inside perception is what counts.”

“We all come from blue collar backgrounds and we don’t want to snub our own roots,” he said. “We don’t take ourselves too seriously.” That’s reflected in the brewery’s name – a play on Sarnia’s main product, refined fuels – and in the fun names given to their beers.

The formula must be working, because too-many-to-count times we have had Savvy Hip Hops subscribers request that we feature Refined Fool again.  If you are in southern Ontario, you will find their beers on tap in more than two dozen bars and restaurants; and they’re coordinating with the city to take over a larger space and expand their operations.  Looks like Nathan & his friends are no fools!

Let’s lift a glass to Nathan & the Refined Fool crew!

 

Savvy Hip Hops Tasting Notes

David shares his notes about each beer, along with David’s picks on what to serve… and some fun recipes too!

Illiterate Librarians: Grapefruit IPA

Illiterate Librarians- Grapefruit IPAPerfect for a hot summer day, this IPA does a terrific job of matching dry citrus flavours with a solid hop backbone. It measures up at 5.7% alcohol by volume (ABV) and 70 International Bitterness Units (IBU).

Tasting Notes: Looking like light honey topped with suds, offers aromas of grapefruit pith and brioche. The acidity is medium, but there’s no sweetness here. Instead, it has the pithy dryness of an Earl Grey tea and a soft, light mouthfeel. The alcohol is certainly apparent, especially in the lingering grapefruit aftertaste.

Suggested Food Pairing: The acidity in this beer calls for a rich, fatty meat. We recommend BBQ duck finished with a Peking sauce.

 

Pouch Envy: Australian Pale Ale

Pouch Envy- Australian Pale AleGalaxy™ hops from the land down under have become a staple in the craft beer maker’s kit. They offer citrus and passion fruit notes with moderate bitterness. This is an easy-drinker, at 5% ABV and 20 IBU.

Tasting Notes: A pretty amber beer with a long-lasting mousse, the aromas of lemon-grass and white rose carry through to the palate. It has a silky mouthfeel and moderate acidity. “Eyes-light-up good!” was the note we made.

Suggested Food Pairing: A wonderful match with seafood, we suggest pan-seared sea scallops and garlic butter (recipe below).

 

Noble Oaf: Rye Saison

Noble Oaf- Rye SaisonThe first Noble Fool beer to make become a permanent fixture on the LCBO’s shelves, this heady rye saison is made with traditional Belgian farmhouse yeast. It measures up at 7.3% ABV and 25 IBU.

Tasting Notes: Pouring a caramel colour with a fast-disappearing head, the beer invokes memories of delicatessen rye bread with its roasted and yeasty notes. The bubbles are fine and Champagne-like, and the hoppiness and lively acidity are in perfect harmony. With a long finish, you’ll find sweet hazelnuts remaining on your palate.

Suggested Food Pairing: Serve alongside roast pork tenderloin in a fruit-based sauce, with a side of potatoes and root vegetables. The acidity will balance the sweetness, while the rye notes will complement the meat (recipe below).

Short Pier, Long Walk: Double IPA

Short pier long walkYou’d never know this stunning pale ale boasts 100+ on the IBU scale just from tasting it. With its high (8.4%) alcohol and stunning flavours, those hops are well-integrated.

Tasting Notes: This pours a beautiful orange marmalade colour with a long lasting, well-structured foam. Aromas of beach air, roasted nuts, and caramel lead to a velour-soft mouthfeel. The alcohol comes through, but the bitterness is balanced by the sweet nutty flavours leaving a hint of marmalade on the finish. This is a “Wow” beer to share with friends.

Suggested Food Pairing: Best enjoyed with some sweet and salty beer nuts (recipe below), this big boy can also handle a grilled rib-eye topped with sautéed mushrooms and onions.

Mid-Life Spices: Braggot

Mid-Life Spices- BraggotHere is a neat new beer style that we are eager for you to try.  What is a Braggot beer you ask? Craft beer enthusiasts’ go-to online resource, BeerAdvocate explains that a Braggot beer is “simply made by blending spices and herbs with mead (honey based wine) and beer, to produce a strong concoction with uncommon flavors”. It’s an ancient drink, with literary references going back to the 12th century. But be advised, at 13% ABV, it packs a wallop!

Tasting Notes: Buckwheat honey-coloured and with no foam at all, you can immediately detect the gingerbread aromas while you pour. Tasting of allspice, ginger, and raisins, it’s reminiscent of a Dark & Stormy cocktail. The acidity is tangy, but it measures out at 0 IBU and finishes with lovely spiced honey notes.

Suggested Food Pairing: Caramelized onion tart (recipe below) or a baked brie. The acidity will perfectly balance the richness of the dish.

TIP: if this beer is overwhelming, try making a shanty with gingerale or sprite.  We put a slice of lime & some mint – this definitely turned heads & made people comment “That looks different – what are you drinking?”

 

The Brouhaha: Nut Brown Ale


The Brouhaha- Nut Brown Ale“Yum!” said Debbie. The Brouhaha, made with English-style yeast and hops, has a moderate 5.7% ABV and 23 IBU. We found it complex and very drinkable.

Tasting Notes: With a beautiful pour the colour of pistachio skins and big-bubble foam, this beer had amazed with the changing flavours. It smells like buckwheat honey and root beer, and the palate shifts quickly from hops to nuts to soya sauce. Smooth and rich, this is a winner!

Suggested Food Pairing: There was no hesitation here: pair this beauty with a backyard burger loaded with your favourite toppings.

Murder of Crows: Black IPA

Murder of Crows- Black IPADespite the contradictory name, black IPAs are super-popular with beer makers right now. After all, why shouldn’t dark beers get some hop love? Another big brew, this hits 8% ABV and 90 IBU.

Tasting Notes: With the thick head and blackstrap appearance of good stout, this has surprising notes of black licorice and flint to balance the dark roasted grain. The hops are rich, but the sweet malt and high alcohol offer good balance. If the Noble Oaf was deli rye, this is a grilled cheese on pumpernickel – with bacon jam –  of course!

Suggested Food Pairing: Sacrifice some of this beer to make a fantastic onion soup, topped with croutons and Gruyère.

Ripsnorter: Bourbon Porter

Ripsnorter- Bourbon PorterIf you’ve never considered “dessert beer”, here’s your opportunity. This smooth, rich brew is a perfect alternative to after-dinner liqueurs. Made with whole vanilla beans and bourbon barrel oak. 8.7% ABV and 37 IBU.

Tasting Notes: Chocolate fudge in colour and with a thick foamy top, this superb porter tastes of caramelized brown sugar, sweet cream, espresso, and vanilla. It’s smooth and flavourful, lingering in the mouth like a good coffee liqueur.

Suggested Food Pairing: Chocolate espresso brownie (recipe below) with a dollop of French vanilla ice cream. I’ll take two helpings, please!

 

 

Recipes to enjoy with the featured Savvy Hip Hops

 

With Pouch Envy: Australian Pale Ale

Pan-seared Scallops with Herb Butter Sauce

Recipe and photo: Fine Cooking

IngredientsScallops

1 lb (450 g) dry large sea scallops
1 Tablespoon (15 mL) unsalted butter
1 Tablespoon (15 mL) extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the sauce:

3 Tablespoons (45 mL) unsalted butter, cut into six pieces
2 Tablespoons (30 mL) finely diced shallot (1 medium shallot)
1/4 cup (60 mL) dry white vermouth or dry white wine
1/4 cup (60 mL) finely chopped mixed fresh herbs, such as flat-leaf parsley and chives
1/4 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
Kosher salt and freshly ground black peppeR
2 to 3 lemon wedges for serving

Method

Remove the tough abductor muscle from the side of each scallop (some scallops are sold with the muscle already removed). If you feel any grit on the scallops, rinse them under cold water. Pat the scallops dry with paper towels; surface moisture impedes browning.  

Heat a 10- or 12-inch non-stick skillet over medium-high heat for 1 to 2 minutes. Add the oil and butter, if using, and heat until quite hot. Pat the scallops dry once more and put them in the pan in a single, uncrowded layer. Season with salt and pepper and let sear undisturbed until one side is browned and crisp, 2 to 4 minutes. Using tongs, turn the scallops and sear until the second side is well browned and the scallops are almost firm to the touch, 2 to 4 minutes. Take the pan off the heat, transfer the scallops to a plate, and set them in a warm spot. Let the pan cool for a minute before you make the sauce.

Return the pan to medium heat. Add a piece of the butter (1/2 tablespoon or 12 mL) and the shallots and sauté until the shallots begin to soften, about 1 minute. Add the vermouth or wine and simmer until reduced by about half, another 1 to 2 minutes. Add the herbs and lemon zest. Reduce the heat to low, add the remaining butter, and whisk constantly until the butter melts into the sauce. Return the scallops and any accumulated juices to the pan. Gently roll the scallops in the sauce to warm them through. Taste for salt and pepper and serve immediately with lemon wedges on the side to squeeze over the scallops.

With Noble Oaf: Rye Saison

Pork Tenderloin with Cranberry Cream Sauce

Recipe: A Taste of Québec
Photo credit: Eating Well

IngredientsPork Chops Refined brewery

2  pork fillets (750g)
2 tablespoons (25 mL) all-purpose flour
Salt and ground black pepper
1 tablespoon (15 mL) butter
1 tablespoon (15mL) vegetable oil

For the sauce:

½ cup (125mL) fresh or frozen cranberries
¼ cup (50mL) granulated sugar
1 beef bouillon cube dissolved in 2 tablespoons (25mL) water
1/4 cup (50mL) whipping cream

Method

Lightly dredge pork fillets in flour seasoned with salt and pepper to taste. Heat butter and oil in a large, heavy frying pan; brown pork quickly on all sides.

Place fillets in a shallow baking dish. Roast in a preheated 350°F (180°C) oven for 15 minutes. Turn off heat, cover pork, and leave in oven to keep warm while preparing sauce.

Meanwhile, combine cranberries, sugar, and dissolved bouillon in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil and cook until sugar has dissolved. With a slotted spoon, remove cranberries from syrup and set aside.

Bring remaining liquid to a full boil and reduce until thickened, but not caramelized.

Whip cream until stiff; fold into warm sauce along with reserved cranberries. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Cut pork into slices. Arrange on 4 heated plates and pour some of the Cranberry Cream Sauce over each serving.

 

With Mid-life Spices: Braggot

French Onion Tart

Recipe and Photo: Food Network

IngredientsPizza refined brewery

1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed in refrigerator overnight
2 Tablespoons (25 mL) extra-virgin olive oil
3 large Vidalia onions or other sweet variety, thinly sliced
4 thyme sprigs, plus more for garnish
Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper
1/3 cup (80 mL) good quality beef stock

Method

Preheat the oven to 400° F (205° C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

On a work surface, roll the puff pastry into a roughly 10 by 16-inch rectangle. With a sharp knife, trim uneven edges to make a perfect rectangle. Evenly cut off the outer 1 inch of each side of the rectangle in strips; put the puff sheet on the baking sheet. Dip your finger in water and run around the top edges of the rectangle and replace the removed strips of pastry along the edges of the sheet, pressing lightly to adhere. With a fork, pierce the interior of the tart shell to prevent rising; do not pierce the adhered edges. Bake until the outer edges have puffed and are golden in colour; about 15 minutes. Set aside.

Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet over medium-low heat. Add onions and thyme sprigs and season well with salt and pepper, to taste. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions begin to brown. Add the stock, a tablespoon at a time, as the pan gets dry, scraping and stirring the brown bits that are stuck to the bottom of the pan. When the onions are caramelized to a dark golden color, remove from the heat and discard the leafless thyme sprigs (the leaves fall off while cooking).

When ready to serve, preheat the oven to 350° F. Evenly spread the caramelized onions on the cooked pastry shell and heat in the oven until warmed through, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove from oven, to a cutting board and cut into wedges. Arrange on a serving platter and garnish each wedge with a sprig of fresh thyme. Serve immediately and enjoy!

 

With Short Pier, Long Walk: Double IPA

Beer Nuts

Recipe and Photo: Food.com

IngredientsBeer Nuts Refined Brewery

4 ½ cups (640 g) peanuts, raw and shelled
2 cups (500 mL) sugar
½ teaspoon (2.5 mL) salt, plus more to taste
1 cup (250 mL) water

Method

Bring peanuts, sugar, salt and water to a boil.

Continue to boil until all liquid is absorbed (approximately 25-30 minutes).

Preheat oven to 300°F (150°C).

Spread nuts on lightly greased jelly roll pan and sprinkle with salt to your liking and.

Bake 20 minutes.

Remove from oven and gently stir, sprinkle with more salt to your liking and bake 20 minutes more.

Cool completely and store in an airtight container.

With Ripsnorter: Bourbon IPA

Chocolate Espresso Brownies

Recipe and Photo: Cookie & Kate

IngredientsCHocoalte

10 Tablespoons (140 g) unsalted butter, cut into ½-inch slices
1¼ cups (312 g) pure cane sugar
¾ cup (187 g) natural unsweetened cocoa powder
½ teaspoon (2.5 mL) fine-grain sea salt
¼ teaspoon (1.25 mL) baking powder
½ teaspoon (2.5 mL) espresso powder or very finely ground coffee (optional)
2 cold large eggs
1½ teaspoons (7.5 mL) vanilla extract
⅔ cup (167 g) white flour
2 ounces (57 g) dark or semi-sweet chocolate, roughly chopped

Method

Preheat the oven to 325°F (165°C) with a rack in the lower third of the oven. Line an 8-inch square baking pan with two criss-crossed pieces of parchment paper, making sure that the paper is long enough to go up the sides a couple of inches. Grease the parchment paper.

Brown the butter: Melt the butter in a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat. Continue to cook the butter, while whisking constantly, until it’s a pale golden brown and the particles suspended in it are reddish brown. This usually takes me about 10 minutes.

Remove the pan from heat and stir in the sugar. Then add the cocoa powder, sea salt, baking powder and espresso powder. Stir until the ingredients are thoroughly incorporated. Let the mixture cool for 5 minutes.

Add the eggs one at a time, beating vigorously with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula after each one. When the mixture looks thick, shiny and well blended, add the vanilla extract and the flour. Stir until you no longer see streaks of flour. Then beat vigorously (put those arm muscles to work!) for 50 strokes with the wooden spoon or spatula.

At this point, the mixture should be no more than slightly warm (if not, let it cool for a few more minutes). Fold in the chocolate chunks or chips.

Spread the batter in the lined pan, then use a knife to make light swirls in the top of the batter. Bake on the lower rack for about 25 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out almost clean. Cool the brownies in the pan on a baking rack.

Once the brownies are completely cool, lift the edges of the parchment paper and transfer the
brownies to a cutting board. Use a sharp chef’s knife to cut the brownies into 16 or 25 squares. 

 

 

Enjoy your Savvy Hip Hops!

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