Posts Tagged ‘Méthode Champenoise’

Clink & Drink Pink! The Rosé Report

Posted by Debbie

Friday, August 22nd, 2014
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Summer is just not summer without uncorking a bottle or two of Rosé. With so many to choose from, our Savvy Sommeliers have hand-picked the best to make a bouquet of Rosé wines (aka a variety of 12 bottles) from different wineries across Ontario.

One Dozen Roses - Savvy CompanyYou won’t find any of these special Rosé wines at the LCBO. Check out the  One Dozen Rosés wines in the August ‘bouquet’. Next to the taste, the best part is FREE shipping.

Here’s our Rosé Report with stories, tasting notes & summertime recipes for the Rose wines in the August selection.

Stock your wine rack with Rosés now!

Cheers & enjoy the sunshine!
The Savvy Team

 

~ The Rosé Report ~

 

fred picardHuff Estates

Huff’s winemaker Frederic Picard is true to his French roots.  Raised amongst the vineyards and wineries in Burgundy France, this man has wine running through his veins.  These dry crisp Rose sparkling and table wine are great examples of how he lends his winemaking talent (nurtured in France, South Africa & other parts of the world) to craft elegant wines in the Canada’s fastest growing wine region – Prince Edward County.

 

Huff Estates Cuvée Janine Sparkling

Huff 2012 Cuvee Janine 2012SPECIAL OFFER ON THIS SPARKLER! We were delighted when General Manager Jason Sharp offered us a special price so we could include this bubbly in the August assorted case of One Dozen Rosés.

Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes: this wine exudes fun – the colour, the refreshing dry tastes and all of the possibilities for food pairings.  Made with 100% Pinot Noir grapes, the wine is made with the class French Method Champagnoise meaning that it is the second fermentation that creates the bubbles occuring in each bottle.  Much care in the cellar is taken to make this elegant crisp sparkling wine.

Food Pairing Suggestions:  Put in your fridge for any occasion – a beautiful sunset, friends dropping by or to begin a long weekend with the popping of its cork.  Chill & enjoy every sip.

 

Huff South Bay Rosé 2012Huff Estates Rose VQA 2013

Savvy Sommeliers Tasting Notes: bone dry with a light pink hue that resembles classic Rose wines from Tavel, France. To sum it up in one word: pink grapefruit.  Added to that light floral notes with citrus (think lime and mandarin) to create a solid refreshing balance.

Food Pairing suggestions: Served chilled on its own to unwind, sushi or pack for a picnic.  A beaut!

 

Château des Charmes Cuvée d’Andrée VQA 2013

Château des Charmes continues to impress the Savvy Team.  While a household name, their wines are top notch. This multi generational family business never ceases to impress.  We were certain that this wine honouring Madame Andrée Bosc – wife, mother and winery matriarch – would be enjoyed by everyone who opens a case of our One Dozen Rosés.  The winemaker’s goal was to make a wine with as much joie de vivre as Madame and this vibrant pink certainly makes a statement!

Chateaau des CharmesSavvy Sommeliers Tasting Notes:  In one word: Refreshing & lively. This salmon coloured wine has characteristics often associated with Sauvignon Blanc wine: grassy, green apple with a zippy minerality.

Food Pairing Suggestions: Cedar plank Salmon and grilled fish off the BBQ would be a stunning match. Don’t stop there! Steamed mussels, clam chowder even lobster would be outstanding.  But take it straight from the experts – Michèle BoscDirector of Marketing for Château des Charmes, is responsible for all aspects of the guest experience at the winery and highly recommends her Cuvée d’Andrée with Pan-Seared Scallops (see recipe below).

 

~ Recipes to Enjoy with your Rosés ~

 

Pan-Seared Scallops with Herbed Butter

From Fine Cooking magazine
S
erves 3

Ingredients

For the scallops

1 lb. dry large sea scallops
1 Tbs. unsalted butter
1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the sauce

3 Tbs. unsalted butter, cut into six  pieces
2 Tbs. finely diced shallot (1 medium shallot)
1/4 cup dry white vermouth or dry white wine
1/4 cup finely chopped mixed fresh herbs, such as flat-leaf parsley and chives
1/4 tsp. finely grated lemon zest
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 to 3 lemon wedges for serving

Method

pan seared scallopsRemove the tough abductor muscle from the side of each scallop (some scallops are sold with the muscle already removed). If you feel any grit on the scallops, rinse them under cold water. Pat the scallops dry with paper towels; surface moisture impedes browning.

Heat a 10- or 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat for 1 to 2 minutes. Add the oil and butter, if using, and heat until quite hot. Pat the scallops dry once more and put them in the pan in a single, uncrowded layer.

Season with salt and pepper and let sear undisturbed until one side is browned and crisp, 2 to 4 minutes. Using tongs, turn the scallops and sear until the second side is well browned and the scallops are almost firm to the touch, 2 to 4 minutes.

Take the pan off the heat, transfer the scallops to a plate, and set them in a warm spot. Let the pan cool for a minute before you make the sauce.

Return the pan to medium heat. Add a piece of the butter (1/2 Tbs.) and the shallots and sauté until the shallots begin to soften, about 1 minute.

Add the vermouth or wine and simmer until reduced by about half, another 1 to 2 minutes. Add the herbs and lemon zest. Reduce the heat to low, add the remaining butter, and whisk constantly until the butter melts into the sauce.

Return the scallops and any accumulated juices to the pan. Gently roll the scallops in the sauce to warm them through. Taste for salt and pepper and serve immediately with lemon wedges on the side to squeeze over the scallops.

 

Enjoy…and remember to Clink & Drink Pink!

 

 

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Where do the sparkles come from in Spain’s Cava?

Posted by Julie

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2011
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I love the bubbles in a sparkling wine. My husband Doug (also a Savvy Sommelier) and I frequently begin a dinner party with a sparkler (as I call it) since it seems so festive and welcoming, although it is a lovely drink on its own and very food friendly.

I was recently enjoying a glass of Cava, which is a Spanish “champagne” style wine named after the caves in which the grapes are fermented. I remembered learning in the sommelier classes how the bubbles are created by undergoing a second fermentation (“still” wine undergoes a single fermentation), the bottles being turned upside down then riddled. (Isn’t riddling a great word?) It definitely lead me to refresh what I know of how sparkling wine is made and in this case, specifically Cava.

As background, almost all Cava is produced in Catalonia, especially the Penedes region in Spain, although eight different provinces are included in the production area. The production methods are the same as in the making of Champagne. Spain’s Cavas are made in the Traditional Method (sometimes referred to as Méthode Champenoise).

First, the grapes are harvested and a white wine is produced. Several types of wine may be blended. Three grape varieties native to Spain are Xarello, Macabeo and Parellada.

Tirajo is the second step and the bottle is filled with the blended wine, then a syrupy mixture of yeast and sugars is added, called licor de tirajo. The yeast will cause the secondary fermentation to occur in the bottle. At this stage, the bottled wine is then transferred to the cellar with a temporary stopper.

The second fermentation is next as the yeasts convert the sugar to carbon dioxide. (It is the carbon dioxide that creates the bubbles.) This second fermentation and bottle aging occurs in the bottle and lasts for nine months at a temperature between 55 and 59 degrees Fahrenheit.

During the second fermentation/aging, the bottles are turned occasionally. This process is called remuage (riddling) and in some wineries, this is still done by hand. This turning of the bottles causes the residue from the yeast to collect in the neck of the wine bottle. The neck of the bottle is then frozen, which forces the yeast sediment out and the bottle is re-corked immediately. You can distinguish Cava by the cork, which should be marked with a four-pointed star.

A toast in Spain is practically always drunk with Cava. This is especially true when the New Year is brought in with twelve grapes swallowed in time to the chimes of the clock in the town square or in the Puerta del Sol, Madrid.

All this just makes me want to jump on a plane and go to Spain, however having just returned from the Niagara Escarpment, this will have to wait. But I suggest the next time you are browsing the wine aisles, why not pick up a bottle of Cava, chill it and you’ll be delighted with how refreshing it tastes – on the patio of course.

As they say in Spain – Aplausos!

 

 

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