Posts Tagged ‘Gewurztraminer’

Debbie’s Phad Thai recipe

Posted by Debbie

Wednesday, January 30th, 2013
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Adapted from Ken Hom Cooks Thai Cookbook
serves 4 -5 people

A good friend of mine taught me how to make Thai food and now I always have the ingredients for Phad Thai on hand.

 

Phad Thai Sauce

1 cup water
1 ½  cups sugar  (less if you rather not as sweet)
2 tablespoons white vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
1 piece of tamarind (approx 1″ x 1″) – purchase this at a Asian supermarket
½ cup ketchup

Method

Combine ingredients in a saucepan, stir and bring to boil.

Lower heat and simmer for approximately 30 minutes.

Strain sauce to collect remaining bits of tamarind (pits, skins etc).  Makes about 2 cupes.  This sauce can be stored in the fridge for weeks.  Reheat when ready to make Phad Thai.

Ingredients for Phad Thai

1 package of rice noodles (medium width)
1 tablespoon oil
1 clove of garlic minced
2-3 teaspoons of fish sauce
1 lime, cut into wedges
1-2 eggs
2 chicken breasts cubed
a couple of handfuls of bean sprouts (washed)
2-3 green onions finely chopped
1/2 cup chopped peanuts or cashews
2-5 sprigs of fresh coriander (coarsely chopped)

Optional items:
1 cup of cubed deep friend tofu (optional)
15 – 30 cooked or raw shrimp (optional)

To assemble

Soak noodles in warm to boiling water to soften (approx 30 minutes or longer.

his part of the assembly takes on 8-10 mins so have everything chopped and ready!

Heat wok. Add oil and garlic. Break eggs into oil and scatter fry. Add chicken and stir until cooked.  If using raw shrimp add to wok when chicken is almost done.

Drain water from noodles and add to wok. Toss continuously.

Pour Phad Thai sauce (as much or as little as you like), green onions, tofu and cooked shrimp (if using). Add fish sauce to taste.

Keep tossing noodles until completely coated with sauce and food is really hot.

 

To Serve Phad Thai

Place a handful of bean sprouts side of plate. Mound noodles beside sprouts. Sprinkle with chopped peanuts, coriander and squeeze lime juice over top. Serve immediately with spring rolls.

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Lighthall Vineyard’s One Man Show

Posted by Erin

Saturday, October 20th, 2012
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Savvy Selections wine of the month club
Featuring Lighthall Vineyards
–  October 2012 –

 

We are heading to Prince Edward County this month to discover a boutique winery that typifies what is meant by a one man show. Lighthall Vineyards is owned by Glenn Symonns who is the winemaker, vineyard manager, Sommelier, chief marketer, distributor, tractor driver, creator and sometimes the delivery guy. It is a stark contrast to his previous career as a pharmacist. While both winemaker and pharmacist are connected through chemistry, it is the ability to create that Glenn enjoys the most. ‘I truly think that I have a great job. I get to play in the cellar and make interesting wines.’ And in this month’s Savvy Selections you will certainly taste exactly what Glenn means.

I first met Glenn not at his winery, but rather when he was serving me wine during his final exam for his Sommelier Accreditation. These role playing practical exams can be un-nerving for the Sommelier ‘students’, yet I succinctly recall that Glenn handled the mock situation with panache. When he began demonstrating the 23 step process and etiquette (or is it a ritual?) of opening a bottle of wine, I could not believe my eyes that in his hands was a bottle of Huff Estates Lighthall Chardonnay VQA 2007 from Prince Edward County. Glenn did not know that I was a huge fan of this wine. I was equally amazed the he was serving a $30 bottle of wine while other Sommelier hopefuls where uncorking sub $10 wines as the judges weren`t going to sip and savour the wine – afterall the exams took place at 10am!

Curious and impressed, I commented about his wine choice and Glenn smiled back and proudly announced, ‘I just bought Lighthall Vineyards and I will be building a winery.’ That is not something you hear every day! Intrigued, I kept a lookout for Glenn on my visits to Prince Edward County. This spring, I visited his winery for the first time and have been enjoying his wines ever since.

In your Savvy Selections, you will find:

Lighthall Progression Sparkling VQA 2011 – an easy drinking Spanish cava style sparkling wine made with Vidal grapes

Lighthall Gewurztraminer VQA 2011 – an absolutely remarkable aromatic white wine – get ready to be impressed

Lighthall Pinot Noir 2010 VQA – one word : Stunning!

OPTIONAL WINE : Lighthall Pinot Noir Reserve Particuliere – Les Grands VQA 2009 – Pinot lovers beware – you will fall in love again with every sip

Stock up on these wines!

Like the sparkling? Stock up because it is almost gone…
Lighthall produces an incredibly small amount of wine. You won’t find them in the LCBO. If you would like more, simply drop me an e-mail at debbie@savvycompany.ca or give me a call at 613-SAVVYCO (613-728-8926). Heads up – the sparkling is almost gone!

Cheers & enjoy your Savvy Selections!

Debbie & Savvy Team

 

Patrick after the crush

Introducing…
Lighthall Vineyards

Presented by Savvy Sommelier Erin Bolling

 

As a lover and student of wine I am excited to have an opportunity to be your Savvy Sommelier and introduce you to Lighthall Vineyards. I think conducting the Savvy Selections tasting panel is a pleasure of the taste buds as well as the mind while we put our heads together to determine recipes to pair with the feature wines. Each time the Savvy Team ‘has to’ work its way through many candidates for the Savvy Selections in order to chose the final selection. Once the wines are chosen, I have the honour to interview the owners and winemakers. This conversation allows me to learn first hand about the wines and am charged with a renewed appreciation for the people behind each bottle of wine.

This month I had the pleasure of meeting Glenn Symons of Lighthall Vineyards. Since 2008, Lighthall has been a one man show. Glenn is the owner, winemaker, field manager and marketing ‘department’. You name he does it! Hearing his story made me exhausted. I can only imagine how he feels each day! In all honesty though, Glenn is overflowing with passion and enthusiasm to be a winemaker.
Pharmacist to winemaker…

Glenn bought Lighthall in 2008 after he sold his Pharmacy – yes you read that right. As a graduate of the Sommelier program at Algonquin College and an amateur winemaker (in his own home), he learned more and more about the wines in Prince Edward County (PEC). Glenn’s temptation to buy a vineyard property in PEC became reality, he dramatically change careers.

Since 2008, Glenn has doubled the size of Lighthall’s property. In addition, he changed the business from a grape growing operation where he grows grapes for other wineries, to a winery in its own right. Since then, Glenn claims that there has been no time to look back!
Being September & October, it took Glenn and I a while to connect since it was in the height of harvest. And this year, harvest was 3 to 5 weeks early. When I did finally reach him, he explained that harvest is his favourite time of year. The last of his Vidal grapes were being picked ‘as we speak’ (these grapes are not for late harvest wines). The Chardonnay and Pinot Noir came in to the crush pad the week before.
There was no doubt in our interview that Glenn was enthused about this past growing season since it was the warmest since 1968. Glenn predicts that 2012 will be an exceptional year for PEC wines and for that matter Ontario too and even broader Canadian wines too.
Overflowing with passion!

As stated earlier Lighthall is a one man show. Other than some seasonal workers, for whom Glenn built a house, Glenn does all the work of vineyard management and winemaking by himself. For the past three seasons he has put in 12 to 18 hour days. In the winter, he can be found tending the 25 acre woodlot which he uses to heat the buildings on the premises. And what comes next? Glenn has plans to try his hand at planting vines. He has his eye on a vineyard of 1 acre of just Gruner Veltliner. This varietal is an Austrian staple and is one of Glenn’s favourite types of wine. While Gruner is not planted in PEC, Glenn explains that it would be well suited to The County’s clay soil and environment. We look forward to his results. Cross your fingers!

Lighthall tasting bar

His passion for his winery is obvious in its design. His tasting bar is located in the middle of his production area. This gives Glenn the ability to share and give his visitors the opportunity to ‘see’ all aspects of the winemaking process. What a terrific experience!
Glenn makes harvest a family affair by involving his children in the crush.
The wine Glenn is most proud of (to date!) is Lighthall Pinot Noir Reserve Particuliere VQA 2009 – Les Grands. Our Savvy Team was impressed too & we offered it as an optional wine. It is hard to believe that this wine was the first red wine that Glenn ever produced…and his two eldest sons helped too!
There is no doubt that Lighthall Vineyards is a small operation with big dreams. The purchase occurred in 2008, the winery was built in 2009, the first Lighthall Vineyard wine was produced in 2009 and last year it opened to the public. When you are next in The County, be sure make a visit.

~ SAVVY SOMMELIER TASTING NOTES ~

 

Lighthall Progression Sparkling 2011 VQA, $20.00

Vidal is a hybrid grape of Ugni Blanc and Rayon d’Or. It’s thick skin and hardiness in cold climates make it an ideal grape to grow in Prince Edward County and Niagara. This particular sparkling wine was made with 100% Lighthall grapes using Charmat method (winespeak: uses a tank second fermentation to create the bubbles).

Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes: Very pale with aromas of white grapefruit and lime with an undertone of minerality. This dry, light sparkler has persistent light bubbles and flavours that mimic the nose with a bit of white peach and apricot thrown in. It is a refreshing wine with a pleasant mouth coating feeling and persistent zesty finish.

Suggested Food Pairing: This sparkling wine is a great starter wine on its own, or could be paired with seafood such as oysters. The tasting panel recommends it with a prosciutto and arugula pizza.

Cellaring: An excellent sipping wine that could be enjoyed now or it could be cellared for a year or two for a special occasion.

Lighthall Gewurztraminer 2011 VQA, $25.00

A classic Gewurztraminer made with high quality grapes sourced from Vineland. This is one of Glenn’s favourite grape variety.

Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes: This wine has hallmark Gewurz pale yellow with a hint of pinkish colouring. Its floral and exotic fruit aromas of lychee, rose petals, pineapple and hard candy. “I just want to keep my nose in the glass” stated one of the Savvy Sommeliers during the tasting panel. “I can’t help myself from swirling and sniffing again and again because it smells so good!”

Slightly effervescent, medium to full wine with a complex palate. You may detect lychee, honey and Turkish Delights taste as the finish lingers.

Suggested Food Pairing: This Gewurztraminer would be perfect with spicy foods such as Indian curry or Asian dishes. ‘Or even with smoked salmon’ commented one of the Savvy Sommeliers. It would also make a tremendous accompaniment to dessert. Enjoy with a pear & cream cheese tart – the recipe follows on the next pages.

Cellaring: This well structured wine is enjoyable now. You can cellar it, however the noteable vibrant aromas and tastes will tone down dramatically.

Lighthall Pinot Noir 2010 VQA, $25.00

Although Pinot Noir is known as the heartbreak grape, this red wine will only bring you joy, proudly stated Glenn.

Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes: A clear pale cherry-red colour with a typical Pinot bouquet of tar, earthiness ripe berries and warm spices. This medium-bodied, dry wine delivers sweet flavours of cherry, blackberries, white pepper and a hint a vanilla with a medium finish.

Suggested Food Pairing: This is a perfect fall food wine and would pair well with classic stuffed turkey, pork tenderloin or a selection of hearty cheeses. Savvy Sommelier Debbie discovered a new recipe of Roasted Califlower and Swiss Chard that she experimented with for her Thanksgiving feast. The recipe is on the following pages.

Cellaring: With 14.5% alcohol this wine is capable of aging another 3-5 years but drinks very well now.

OPTIONAL WINE: Lighthall Pinot Noir Reserve Particulière – Les Grands, 2009 VQA, $50.00

Glenn’s pride and joy. This rich Pinot Noir was part of an extremely low yield and as you can imagine the wine is in VERY short supply. Members of our tasting panel emailed me the following day after our Savvy Selections tasting telling me they were still dreaming about this wine so we had to offer it as an optional wine!

Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes: A bright ruby colour with a pleasing earthy, smokey, cherry and mushrooms on the nose. The deep flavours give you tart yet ripe cherries, smoke and earthy mushrooms fill your mouth and leaves you with a pleasant woodsy, vanilla finish.

Suggested Food Pairing: Everyone agreed that this wine was a must include for October. It is versatile and would make a lovely ‘meditation’ wine on its own or a great food wine with brisket or game meat. Then when the mushroom risotto was suggested, there were many oohs and aaaahs of delight with this pairing.

Cellaring: This medium bodied wine still has time to develop so feel free to lay it down if you like.

~RECIPES TO ENJOY WITH YOUR SAVVY SELECTIONS~

 

With Lighthall Progression Sparkling VQA 2011…

Prosciutto and Arugula Pizza

From: Epicurious.com
Serves 4

Ingredients
1/2 cup small to medium arugula leaves
3 very thin slices prosciutto
2 ounces mozzarella (preferably fresh)
All purpose flour for dusting
Pizza Dough for one 9-inch pizza (click here for a good recipe)
1/2 cup Pizza Sauce – recipe below

Method for pizza sauce

Take a 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes in puree (about 3 1/2 cups) and mix with 3 Tablespoons of olive oilIn a large non-reactive saucepan bring tomatoes and oil to a simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, simmer for 20 minutes, or until sauce is reduces to about 2 1/2 cup

Season sauce with salt and cool to room temperature. This sauce keeps, covered and chilled in the fridge for 5 days and freezes well

Assemble the pizza

At least 45 minutes before baking pizza, put a pizza stone or 4 to 6 unglazed “quarry” tiles arranged close together on oven rack in lowest position in oven and preheat oven to highest setting (500°-550°F)

Trim any tough stems from arugula and thinly slice cheese.

On a lightly floured surface pat out dough evenly with your fingers, keeping hands flat and lifting and turning dough over several times, into a 9-inch round. Do not handle dough more than necessary and if dough is sticky, dust it lightly with flour.

Dust a baker’s peel or rimless baking sheet with flour and carefully transfer dough to it. Jerk peel or baking sheet once or twice and, if dough is sticking, lift dough and sprinkle flour underneath it, reshaping dough if necessary. Working quickly, top dough with sauce, spreading with back of a spoon to within 1/2 inch of edge. Arrange mozzarella slices evenly over sauce. Line up far edge of peel or baking sheet with far edge of stone or tiles and tilt peel or baking sheet, jerking it gently to start pizza moving.

Once edge of pizza touches stone or tiles, carefully pull back peel or baking sheet, completely transferring pizza to stone or tiles (do not move pizza).

Bake pizza 6 to 7 minutes, or until dough is crisp and browned, and transfer with a metal spatula to a cutting board. Scatter arugula over pizza and arrange prosciutto slices on top. 

With Lighthall Gewurztraminer VQA 2011…

Pear & Cream Cheese Tart

From: Desserts by Bonnie Stern
Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients
Base
½ cup unsalted butter
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1 cup all purpose flour

Filling
2 ripe pears (preferably Bartlett)
4 oz cream cheese
½ cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
¾ cup cream
½ tsp vanilla
¼ cup sliced almonds

Method

Preheat oven to 425. Butter a 9 or 10” pie plate with removable sides.

For the shortbread base, cream butter and sugar together until light. Beat in flour and pat into pie plate – no need to roll it out.

Peel, halve and core pears and slice and arrange in circular rows on top of base. Stir cream cheese until smooth then beat in sugar, add eggs one at a time, beating mixture smooth after each addition then add cream and vanilla. Pour over pears & Sprinkle with almonds.

If there is any leftover custard, bake separately with any leftover pears or other fruit for a little treat for the chef.Bake for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 375 and bake for 25 to 30 minutes longer, or until fruit is tender and custard is set.Serve warm or cold.

With Lighthall Pinot Noir VQA 2010 …

Roasted Cauliflower and Swiss Chard Salad

From: Long Nights and Log Fires Cookbook
Serves 4

Ingredients
1/4 cup olive oil
1 small head of cauliflower, separated into large florets
1 tsp ground cumin
6 large Swiss chard leaves, roughly chopped into 1 inch wide strips
1 red onion, cut into wedges
2 garlic cloves chopped
14 oz can chickpeas, rinses and drained
1/4 cup tahini (sesame seed paste)
2 Tbsps freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/4 tsp fresh ground pepper
sea salt

Method

Over high heat in a cast iron pan or large skillet, put in the oil. Add the cauliflower florets and cook for 8 to 10 minutes turning often (you will want some brown or burnt looking marks – this is a good sign!). Then add the cumin and cook stirring for 1 minute, add the Swiss Chard, onion and garlic to the pan and cook for a further 2 to 3 minutes. Add chickpeas and stir. Season to taste with salt.

In a separate bowl, combine the tahini, lemon juice and pepper. Add a little salt to taste. Whisk to combine. Transfer the vegetables into a bowl and drizzle the dressing over the top to serve.

Enjoy as a rustic vegetarian dish or a side accompanying pork cutlets, baked ham or turkey.

With Lighthall Pinot Noir Reserve Particulière – Les Grands VQA 2009 …

Mushroom Risotto

From: The Essential Rice Cookbook
Serves 4

Ingredients
2 Tablespoons dried porcini mushrooms
1 litre (32 fl oz) vegetable or chicken stock
2 Tablespoons butter
1 small onion
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 ¾ cups risotto rice
Pinch of freshly ground nutmeg
1 cup mushrooms, sliced (a variety of mushrooms would be good)
½ cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
3 Tablespoons finely chopped parsley

Method

Soak the porcini mushrooms in 2 cups (500 ml/ 16 fl oz) boiling water for 30 minutes. Drain, reserving the liquid then chop the porcini and pass the liquid through a sieve. Pour the stock into a saucepan, bring to the boil and reduce keeping it at a low simmer.

Heat the oil and butter in a wide heavy saucepan to cook the onion and garlic until soft but not brown. Stir in the rice until it is well coated.

Add the fresh mushrooms and nutmeg; season and cook, stirring for 1-2 minutes. Then add the porcini and their liquid, increase the heat and cook until the liquid has been absorbed. Add ½ cup (125 ml/4fl oz) of the stock and stir constantly over medium heat until all the liquid has been absorbed. Continue adding stock a bit at a time until all the liquid is absorbed and the rice is tender and creamy – which should take about 25-30 minutes.

Remove from the heat and stir in the Parmesan and parsley and serve

Enjoy your Savvy Selections!

 

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Easy as Pie!

Posted by Patti

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012
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One of our Savvy Selections wine of the month subscribers invited me to dinner & served this dessert.  It is OMG delicious!  And while he fessed up that he doesn’t usually make desserts, this recipe is no sweat at all. His tip – be watchful that the pie pastry doesn’t brown too quickly.

Quick Apple Tart

Ingredients

1 sheet frozen puff pastry (half of 17.3-ounce package), thawed
3 medium Golden Delicious apples, peeled, cored, very thinly sliced
2 Tbsp (1/4 stick) unsalted butter, melted
3 Tbsp white sugar mixed with 1/2 teaspoon (or so) of ground cinnamon
1/4 cup apricot jam, melted

 

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Line baking sheet with parchment paper. Unfold pastry on parchment paper (do not skip this step!)
  3. Using the tines of fork, pierce 1/2-inch border around edge of pastry, then pierce center all over
  4. Arrange apples atop pastry in 4 rows, overlapping apple slices and leaving border clear.
  5. Brush apples with melted butter; sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. Bake 30 minutes.
  6. Brush melted jam over apples. Put the tart back into the oven until golden, about 8 minutes longer. Serve warm or at room temperature.

What bottle of wine to uncork?

When you pair a dessert with a wine, the rule of thumb is to select a wine that is sweeter than the dessert. Nothing goes better with an apple dessert than Ontario ice wine. Chill a glass of icewine made with Vidal or Riesling or even Gewürztraminer and you have a heavenly match. See our list of suggested Ice wines

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Fielding Estate Winery

Posted by Julie

Thursday, August 30th, 2012
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Savvy Selections wine of the month club
Featuring Fielding Estate Winery
– August 2012 –

 

Outstanding Riesling, Pinot Gris and Meritage and down home hospitality are what come to mind when we think of Fielding Estate Winery located on the Beamsville Bench (Niagara Escarpment). Twelve years and countless awards later, the Fielding family is continuing to work their magic in the vineyards. It is no wonder that Fielding has been named among Canada’s Top 10 wineries.  In the following pages, Savvy Sommelier Julie will tell you some of the reasons why.

Julie caught up with Heidi Fielding when she was visiting Ottawa for an interview by CTV for the annual Graze the Bench that runs on June 9 & 10th to celebrate the growing season. Good wine paired with delicious hors d’oeuvres flowed all weekend. At Fielding, Pulled Duck Sliders with Warm Potato Salad created by August Restaurant was served at the winery paired with Fielding’s Sauvignon Blanc VQA 2011 and Cabernet Franc VQA 2010.

It’s only August but are you starting to think about a dinner party this fall with all of the fresh produce? We can make it easy for you with this month’s Savvy Selections. At the panel tasting, our Savvy Sommeliers easily agreed that Fielding Estates wines are top-notch & we are excited to introduce you to them this month.

In your Savvy Selections, you will find:

Fielding Estate Sparkling Riesling VQA – joy in a glass!

Fielding Estate Vineyard Rock Pile Pinot Gris VQA 2011 – refreshing & simply outstanding

Fielding Estate Meritage VQA 2007 – stunning is an understatement

OPTIONAL WINE: Fielding Estate Cabernet Sauvignon VQA $34.95 regularly $44.95

In the following pages of this Savvy eZine, Julie shares history about the family run business along with the Savvy Selections tasting panel’s notes with a dinner party in mind.

Outstanding wine & prices

Fielding Estates has offered us $35 off the regular prices of their featured wines in this month’s Savvy Selections.  Once you have opened them & would like to have additional bottles, contact me directly to re-order.  Heads up that there are only a few bottles of the Pinot Gris left and by the time I finish this sentence, they may all be gone!  In any case, contact me & I will gladly make the arrangements for additional Fielding or other Ontario wineries that we have featured to be delivered to your home, office…or even cottage!

Save the date: Thursday November 8th

You are the first to know! Our 5th annual Savvy Sip, Swirl, Savour & Selebrate wine evening will feature winemakers who we have showcase in the Savvy Selections. This fun reception style event will take place again this year at the National Arts Centre on Thursday November 8th.  This is our annual wine tasting party to celebrate our 9th year in business with you & our winery clients.  For now, pencil the date into your calendar…more details to come!

From all of us at Savvy Company, we thank you for continuing to be a subscriber to Savvy Selections.

Cheers & Enjoy!


Debbie & Savvy Team




Introducing…

Fielding Estate Winery

Presented by Savvy Sommelier Julie Stock

 

In year 2000, Ken & Marg Fielding, purchased 53 acres of peach & pear orchards.  While recently retired, their sole intention was to plant grapes & building a winery. Looking back 12 years later with their son Curtis (right), a former race car driver & his wife Heidi (left), the family have seen the vineyards have come to fruition. The winery is a family affair & most importantly, Ritchie Richards, whom the family had known for years prior to joining Fielding, is now the talented & highly awarded winemaker.

The property was first planted with Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah vines. In 2002, the harvest was small, but the results proved rewarding. In 2003, Mother Nature blasted Ontario with a harsh winter.  No doubt as an apology, 2004 was a fabulous year & the Fielding family produced their largest harvest of approximately 8000 cases of wine. At this point, they were well on their way to producing premium wines, not to mention winning impressive Canadian wine awards.

My husband, Doug, (also a Sommelier on the Savvy Team) & I met up with the whole family in June while doing our annual Niagara pilgrimage. We were toured around the nooks & corners of the winery like royalty.

Ritchie works his magic!

Educated at nearby Brock University’s Cool Climate Oenology & Viticulture Institute, Ritchie honed his experience at other local Niagara wineries – one being Stratus Vineyards – before being hailed to Fielding. Mark my words that we will be reading about Ritchie’s talent for a long time to come. He believes in extrapolating the best of the unique characteristics of the soil & climate. With each sip, you will recognize his talent too. It is no wonder that Ritchie’s took home a motherload of medals at this year’s Cuvee (Ontario wine industry’s equivalent of Academy Awards) including Gold for his Estate Bottled Pinot Gris VQA 2010, Viognier VQA 2010 & Cabernet Franc VQA 2010. Congrats Ritchie!

The Vineyards


Fielding has two main vineyards – The Jack Rabbits Flats Vineyard on the Lincoln Lakeshore sub-appellation comprises 40 acres of stoney deposits in sandy loam soil which holds the warmth of sun exposure. Curtis & Heidi explained that the red grape varieties do really well on this parcel of land giving the wines a complexity of rich dark fruit flavours. From this vineyard, they won the Cuvee 2012 Gold medals for their 2009 Red Conception & 2012 Cabernet Franc. As well, they explained the white Pinot Gris grapes also develop very impressive flavours from this mature soil. As an aside, I asked where the name “Jack Rabbits” comes from & they laughingly said “well aside from there used to be the tons of jack rabbits in the vicinity, it used to be a “parking spot”, at which they smiled & left the rest to my imagination. Similar story for the reason the wine is called Conception.

The other 13 acres – called the Fielding Vineyard – are located on the eastern slope of the Beamsville Bench. The bench provides clay loam soil with a deep limestone base to promote good natural drainage. The growing season is a little longer & more suited to Riesling; the wine ultimately features the unmistakable crisp minerality of their birthplace. This seems like the right time to mention that in 2010 their Riesling was in named one of the top ten wines in Canada. Congrats!

Hot enough for ya?

The most asked question at wineries this summer is the impact of the unforgiving heat. As Heidi put it, “we are not committed to doing one particular method with any one varietal, rather we will do the best to showcase the grapes in any given year & see how it all turns it out.” That is the beauty of winemaking.

We had not been long at the winery before we start to feel like part of the extended family. Heidi’s infectious warm personality is so representative of the Fielding hospitality. From ‘The Lodge’, on a clear day, you can see Toronto beyond Lake Ontario, yet it is easy to feel like you are in the Haliburtons comfortably sitting in their infamous Muskoka chairs on the grounds as well as on their wine label – all in effort to depict a relaxed style of the Fieldings. Hiedi sums it up best, “when people come to visit our winery, we want their experience to be fulfilling & leave with a wonderful and memorable experience.”  I can assure Heidi, Curtis, Marg & Ken that a visit to their winery, left Doug & I with great memories & a closer connection to the Fielding family & their wines. Cheers!

Discoveries in the cellar

When touring the cellars at Fielding Winery, amongst the typial stacks of French & American oak barrels, Doug & I also saw something amazing, not before seen in our wine travels. Three stainless steel tanks on top of one another each containing about 26,000 litres of different wine. The picture does not do it justice but it was quite a sight!

 

~ SAVVY SOMMELIER TASTING NOTES ~

Sparkling Riesling Brut VQA Ontario, $27.95

We often see the term “charmat method” on bottles of sparkling white wine. Similar to the way that Champagne is made in France, the charmat method is basically taking the grape juice through two fermentations. The first one turns the grape juice into wine (without bubbles), the second fermentation takes place in large stainless steel pressurized containers or tanks which, when the winemaker adds yeast and sugar to the wine this create carbon dioxide (CO2) which in turn creates the bubbles. The tiny bubbles create a “mousse” and can give the wine a yeasty and toasty mouthfeel. The charmat method receives its’ name after a Frenchman named Eugene Charmat who invented the process.

Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes: No doubt about it, all the Savvy Sommeliers were impressed with this “sparkler”. Pale gold, bright and clear with aromas of honey and pear, peaches and almonds. The aromas follow through on the palate with a pinch of minerality, petrol and lemon drop candies. The wine is dry and well-balanced. It has beautiful acidity with fruit flavours that linger in the aftertaste.

Suggested Food Pairing: The Savvy team had no difficulty matching this with all kinds of appetizers or just enjoying it on its own. Proscuitto wrapped melon, salty crisps, sushi, puff pastry bites, buttery lobster all came to mind.

Cellaring: No need to wait for a special occasion – uncork now!

Fielding Estate Rock Pile 2011 Pinot Gris VQA, $24.95

There is a distinct pile of stones in the Jack Rabbit Flats Vineyard that marks a mature block of Pinot Gris vines, planted nearly 20 years ago. Although the vines are low-yielding they are carefully hand-picked which results in a wine full of character.

Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes: This golden hued baby was reminiscent of tropical fruit; peaches, pears, bananas, pineapple and was unlike any other Pinot Gris’s we have tasted in the past.  There is alot happening in the medium body wine that sip after sip brought more to the surface and the crisp acidity brought out lemon-lime flavours. The wine is slightly off-dry with an aftertaste of butterscotch that reminded one Savvy sommelier of luscious icing covered Turkish delight candy on the finish. We urge you not to serve this beauty too cold since the flavours open up like a flower after it has sat for awhile. Take it from the fridge about 15 minutes prior to serving – simply yummy!

Suggested Food Pairing: There were umpteen food ideas that came to mind to the point we were all getting hungry!  There is enough body in the wine to handle grilled pork tenderloin with a fruit salsa, plank salmon, or a summer salad with seafood. The flavours make it so versatile that we even thought it would even be delicious with lemon meringue pie. Definitely a wine for all seasons.

Cellaring: Again…no reason to wait. Drink now or within the next two years.

Fielding Estate Meritage 2007 VQA Niagara Peninsula, 
$34.95

(regularly $59.95 – a special discount for Savvy Selections subscribers)

A red Meritage is made from a blend of at least two or more varieties: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, or Petit Verdot with no varietal comprising more than 90% of the blend. In this Meritage, the components of the final blend were vinified separately following eighteen months aging in barrels on lees (winespeak for the grape skins) then selected through a series of tastings and trial blends. It is no surprise this wine received GOLD MEDAL 2009 – Canadian Wine Awards (ranked best red blend in Canada).

Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes: After one sip, we all looked at each other and went “ummmmmm”, oh my where to start. This blend of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc sifts aromas of chocolate, warm spices, black plums almost reminiscent of Christmas cake. The velvety silky texture coats the inside of the mouth with fine tannins and luscious dark berry flavours. This full bodied wine is concentrated and complex that finishes with the above flavours plus a hint of coffee and caramel.

Suggested Food Pairings: Prime rib roast beef, beef tenderloin, baby back ribs, steak topped with blue cheese and horseradish all come to mind. It is definitely a red meat wine.

Cellaring: Enjoy now and will drink best 2012 to 2018. Decant in its youth.

 

~RECIPES TO ENJOY WITH YOUR SAVVY SELECTIONS~

 

For this month’s selection of recipes we decided to offer you something different …

When the Savvy Sommeliers finally decided on which wines to feature (it was a difficult decision), one said the selected wines would be ideal to serve at a dinner party.

Depending on the size of your dinner party you may want to have more than one bottle of each, but we all thought that the following recipes would make a fabulously elegant dinner party, many of the dishes can be prepared ahead.

We hope you agree and would be thrilled with your feedback.

With Fielding Sparkling Riesling …

Parmesan Crisps

From the kitchen of Savvy Sommelier Julie



There are so many versions of this recipe but nothing could be simpler, or more delicious to match with this sparkling wine. The fruity bubbles in the wine compliment the saltiness in the cheese and just send you back nibbling for more. I sometimes serve them a little red pepper jelly on the side.
A perfect hors d’oeuvres – beware, folks inhale these!

Ingredients
1-1/12 cups of grated Parmesan depending how many crisps you would like to make.
Should yield about 20 small crisps.

Method
Preheat often to 400 degrees and put a heaping tablespoon of the Parmesan onto a parchment lined baking sheet. I would space the spoonfuls about an inch apart.

Bake about 8 minutes or check them after 5 and they should be just slightly golden.

With Fielding Rock Pile Pinot Gris …

Arugula & Hazelnut Salad

www.chatelaine.com

Ingredients
2 Tbsp (30 mL) white-wine vinegar
1 tsp (5 mL) Dijon mustard
1 garlic clove, minced
1/4 tsp (1 mL) each dried thyme leaves and salt
Pinch of granulated sugar
1/4 cup (50 mL) olive oil
1/4 cup (50 mL) snipped chives
3 pink grapefruits or tangerines
1 fennel bulb
12 cups baby arugula
6 slices of prosciutto (optional)
3/4 cup (175 mL) toasted hazelnuts

Method

In a bowl, whisk vinegar with Dijon, garlic, thyme, salt and sugar. Slowly whisk in oil and stir in chives.

Cut off the top and bottom of grapefruits then slice off and discard remaining peel, including all white pith. Carefully slice segments out, leaving membrane that separates them behind. Set segments aside and discard membrane.

Trim the feathery fronds from fennel and discard the core & slice fennel into thin strips.

Place arugula, grapefruit segments and fennel in a large bowl. Drizzle with dressing. Toss to mix. Divide between plates.

Tear prosciutto and scatter overtop. Sprinkle with hazelnuts.

If making ahead, prepare dressing, fennel and nuts. Dressing will keep well, covered and refrigerated, for up to 1 week. Cover and refrigerate grapefruit and fennel up to 1 day. Store nuts in an airtight container up to 1 week.

With Fielding Meritage …

Recipe #1 – To serve with the Main Course

Rib Roast with Garlic Mustard Rub

Bonnie Stern’s Friday Night Dinners 

Serves 10

TIP: Use a meat thermometer to make sure the roast is cooked to medium-rare. (Don’t take a chance after paying so much for such a gorgeous roast).

Ingredients
1/4 cup (50 mL) Dijon mustard
2 tbsp (25 mL) extra-virgin olive oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp (15 mL) finely chopped fresh rosemary; or 1 tsp (5 mL) dried
1 tbsp (15 mL) fresh thyme, or 1 tsp (5 mL) dried
1 tbsp (15 mL) kosher salt
1 tbsp (15 mL) pepper
1 6-lb (3 kg) standing rib roast, boneless rib boast or strip sirloin roast
2 shallots, thinly sliced
3/4 cup (175 mL) dry red wine
1 cup (250 mL) beef stock

Method

In a small bowl, combine mustard, oil, garlic, rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper and smear roast all over with mustard rub.  Then place in a shallow roasting pan, fast side up. 

Roast meat in a preheated 425 degrees F (220 degrees C) over for 20 minutes. Reduce heat to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) and continue to roast for 1 1/4 to 2 hours, or until a meat thermometer reaches 130 degrees F (55 degrees C) for medium-rare.

Transfer roast to a cutting board and allow to rest for 20 minutes before carving.

While roast is resting, place roasting pan on stove over medium-high heat and skim off fat.  Then add shallots and wine and cook until reduce to 2 tbsp (25 mL) and add stock and cook until reduced to a 1/2 cup (125 mL).

To carve, remove string from roast and cut off bones in one piece by cutting between meat and bones. Cut bones apart and serve with meat (to guests who want them the most!). Turn roast over on carving board so it is sitting boned side down and carve into slices. Spoon juices over roast when serving.

I would also serve some simple green beans or snap peas and mashed potatoes with the roast. To make it extra dressy, try the yorkshire puddings (below).

Individual Yorkshire Puddings

Yorkshire pudding is a traditional accompaniment for roast beef, and many people can’t do without it.

Method

Place muffin pan in oven and preheat oven to 350 degrees F (180 degrees C).

Meanwhile, combine 1 1/2 cups (375 mL) all-pupose flour and 1 tsp (5 ml) kosher salt in a large bowl.In a second bowl, whisk 11/2 cups warm milk (or soy milk) with 3 eggs and whisk into flour mixture. Do not overmix or worry about little lumps.

Brush hot muffin pan with roast dripping and spoon about 1/4 cup (50 mL) batter into each cup.

Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until puffed and browned. Serve hot. (You can also bake the batter in mini muffin pans. Use 2 tbsp / 25 mL batter per cup and bake for 25 minutes). Makes 12 puddings.

 

Recipe #2 – To serve with Dessert course along with a glass of Meritage …

Bittersweet Chocolate Terrine

From the kitchen of Savvy Sommelier Patti

Ingredients
14oz bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
½ cup    plus 2 tbsp. Unsweetened cocoa
5 tbsp.strong espresso coffee (cooled)
2 tbsp. brandy
6 large eggs, room temperature
½ cup sugar
1 cup heavy cream chilled

One loaf pan, 8½” x 4½” x 3”, greased and lined with baking parchment
Heat oven to 325 degrees

Method

Put the chopped chocolate into a heatproof bowl with the cocoa and coffee. Set over a pan of barely simmering water and melt gently, stirring frequently.  Once it has melted, remove the bowl from the heat, stir in the brandy and let cool.

Meanwhile put the eggs into the bowl of an electric mixer and beat until frothy. Add the sugar and beat until the mixture is pale and very thick.

In another bowl, whip the cream until it holds a soft peak. Using a large metal spoon, gently fold the chocolate mixture into the eggs. When combined, fold the whipped cream in.Spoon the mixture into the prepared pan, then stand the pan in a bain-marie.Bake in a preheated oven at 325 for about 1 hour to 1 ¼ hours or until a skewer inserted into the center of the mixture comes out clean.

Remove from the oven and let cool in the bain-marie for about 45 minutes, then lift the pan out of the bain-marie and leave until completely cold. Chill overnight then turn out.

Serve dusted with confectioner’ sugar or alternately prepare a bittersweet chocolate ganache and smooth over entire surface.Store, well wrapped in refrigerator.


Enjoy your Savvy Selections!

 

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Palatine Hills Estate Winery

Posted by Susan

Thursday, August 30th, 2012
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Savvy Selections wine of the month club
Featuring Palatine Hills Estate Winery
– July 2012 –

 

John Neufeld and his wife Barbara are the proud owners of Palatine Hills Estate Winery, named after a local gristmill dating back to the late 1700s. John, a history buff, has created a display case of small artifacts from the War of 1812, found on the farm that holds a prominent place in the tasting area. This year is the bicentennial of the War of 1812 and John is leading the charge to commemorate the war in Niagara. He has created two wines called ‘1812’ – a Merlot/Cabernet and a Chardonnay, that have become the official wines of the bicentennial celebration. Approachable, appealing and affordable, these wines are available in the LCBO. In fact, they were the official wines of the recent royal visit of Charles and Camilla. A percentage of the sales proceeds goes to support local historical societies staging 1812 commemorative events. And if that weren’t enough, these commerative wines are being served on all Via Rail trains.

John and Barbara purchased their property in 1972, and set about converting it from a fruit orchard to a vineyard. With 140 acres under vine, their focus is on vitis vinifera grape varietals, such as the Cabernets, Merlot, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, Gewürztraminer, along with some hybrid varietals such as Vidal. John explains, “producing grape juice for local winemakers, as well as bulk wine has always been and will remain part of our business”. His grape juice and wine finds its way to Québec and Nova Scotia, as well as to the northern United States. His venture into winemaking was serendipitous – with an excess of icewine juice in 1998, John and Barbara decided to try their hand at winemaking. Their first attempt at icewine won Wine of the Year at the 2003 Ontario Wine Awards! Just like that Palatine Hills was on the map. When our Savvy Sommelier Susan Desjardins asked during the interview which he was going to be – grape grower or a winemaker – John shared that he would go his own way. “I like to make my own decisions, so decided I would be a winemaker, and continue my business of producing grape juice and bulk wine”. As demand for this award-winning icewine sky-rocketed, a tasting room was hastily created and Palatine Hills Estate Winery opened its doors in 2003. In 2006, the winery was named Canadian Icewine Producer of the year.

The winery has come a long way since then – Susan recalls that her first sampling of Cabernet Sauvignon icewine was at the modest tasting room and the icewine is still as luscious as ever! Now the winery produces 35,000+ cases of wine, including fabulous reds such as the 2007 ‘Proprietors Reserve’ Merlot, recently awarded gold and best red wine at 2012 Cuvée (the Academy Awards of the Ontario wine industry).

It was a difficult task indeed to choose three wines—so, we haven’t! Yes, they are all that good, and great value. In your Savvy Selections, you will find:
Sauvignon Blanc VQA 2011 – suave & satiny
Cabernet Franc VQA 2010 – a well-rounded red wine
Meritage VQA 2010 – a full-on wine layered with delicious complexities.

Some of the subscribers added the luscious Gewürztraminer VQA 2010, elegant mouth filling Chardonnay VQA 2010, and the ‘bring me to the BBQ’ mid-weight Cab/Merlot VQA 2010. And you can’t forget Romeo – the Pinot Noir Sparkling. If you would like more of your favorite Palatine Hills wine, simply call on me to arrange a delivery as you won’t find these wines at the LCBO!

Cheers & Enjoy!
Debbie & Savvy Team
613-SAVVYCO (728-8926)



Palatine Hills Estate Winery

Presented by Sommelier Susan Desjardins

After 40 years on this property, and many years as the Chair of the Ontario Grape Growers, John Neufeld is at ease discussing all aspects of the business at Palatine Hills. “The property is what’s known as Vineland clay loam, from sandy loam to light stony clay. It offers excellent drainage and allows the roots to penetrate deeply, creating very vigorous vines. We use the Scott Henry training system (cordons are trained horizontally along wires) to control vigor and reduce shading. Shoot positioning and leaf removal are used to maximize sunlight, with a focus in on creating flavour intensity.” If this is too technical for your liking, you can be assured that one thing is for certain, John is a highly respected grape grower.

Learning more about the War of 1812

When asked about the ‘1812’ wines, a twinkle appears in John’s eye. ‘When I found artifacts on the property, my interest in War of 1812 piqued.” For me to learn more, I delved into a recent article in The Globe & Mail that provided me a history lesson, explaining how the war started, in June 1812, when the Americans declared war against Great Britain. The British had established a blockade, preventing U.S. ships from reaching French ports during the Napoleonic wars, while the Americans were threatening to take territory from the British and to drive them out of North America. Canada became the theatre for this war, which included skirmishes and engagement over 2 ½ years and stretched along Lakes Erie and Ontario and up the St. Lawrence to Montreal. The G&M article highlights significant events of the war: “Sir Isaac Brock led English Canada and its native allies to victory [over the Americans] at Queenston Heights in 1812. Charles de Salaberry did the same for French Canada at Châteauguay, near Montreal, in 1813.” And some claim this war helped create a national identity and led to the Canada we know today.

Back to the wine …

While John focuses on growing the best possible fruit in the vineyard, Jeff Innes (left), who joined Palatine Hills as winemaker in 2010, focuses on a subtle winemaking process that is creating award-winning wines. After tasting a dozen wines, mostly from the 2010 vintage, Jeff’s wines have a distinctive style characterized by incredibly satiny textures, outstanding balance and the very subtle use of oak.

Jeff’s father wandered into the tasting room as we began sampling the red wines. He commented, “I’ve always loved being an amateur winemaker and entering my wines into various competitions.” This interest and dedication to his craft rubbed off on his son, who helped his dad from a young age. “My career started at Reif Estates, and from there I went to Vineland Estates. I was also involved in the first vintages for Harbour Estates and Peninsula Ridge. I eventually joined Harbour Estates as winemaker in 2000, then went down to Georgia to Three Sisters Vineyard for a year—yes, there is at least one vineyard in Georgia! I came back to Canada in 2003 and took on the role of winemaker at The Grange of Prince Edward, where I worked until joining Palatine Hills.”  Jeff’s dad says under his breath, “He’s far outstripped me now!”

When asked about influences on his career – other than his dad! – Jeff immediately mentions Brian Schmidt, the winemaker at Vineland Estates. “He has been my mentor for years, and helped me map out my career path. In fact, he’s still my sounding board!”  Brian’s mentoring coupled with the various work experiences have strongly influenced Jeff’s approach to winemaking. “A good varietal wine shows off the true character of the grape, and maintains that character through the aging process. Blends, for me, are all about balance and texture—when you taste the wine, you want the flavours to coat the palate and to maintain their consistency through the finish.”

Smooth as silk

Jeff’s great passion for his craft and his very hands-on approach to the winemaking process comes through as we taste the wines. Not only does he respect the traditions of old-world winemaking, he looks to meld those traditions with new technology and techniques, and to optimize the quality of the wine from the vineyard to your glass. A good example is the 2010 Sauvignon Blanc, where he has used subtle oaking with a combination of one new and several neutral barrels on optimally ripened fruit from an outstanding vintage to create an incredibly flavourful, silky wine. He laughs and says “I think you’ve defined my style!”

Enjoy your Savvy Selections!


~ Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes ~


Neufeld Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc 2011 VQA, $18.00

Jeff held his breath as we tasted this wine . . . then let us in on the secret. Sixty percent of the wine was barrel fermented – only one new barrel was used, the balance 5+ years seasoned – while 40% was fermented in stainless steel. Subtly handled oak provides the lovely satiny texture.|

Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes: Offering attractive aromas of new-mown hay, tropical fruit and citrus, this fabulous wine caresses the palate with its suave, satiny texture. Crisp yet round, with flavours of passion fruit, tangerine and lemon-lime, it has a vibrant fresh finish with just a touch of butterscotch.

Suggested Food Pairing: There’s weight here for chicken or pork, or a spinach salad with goat cheese and grilled shrimp.

Cellaring: No need to wait! You’ll want to open this wine right now!

Neufeld Vineyard Cabernet Franc 2010 VQA, $19.95

Displaying the rich well-ripened fruit and intense extraction of the vintage, this savoury Cabernet Franc was initially barrel-aged for 10 months. Jeff explains, “For this varietal wine, my assistant and I tasted each barrel, then chose select barrels for further aging in French and American oak (50/50).”

Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes: Inky and perfumed, the notes of lavender and violet mingle with mixed berry fruit, vanilla and smoke. Dry, medium-full bodied, this well-rounded wine offers complexity of flavours–black cherries and berries, pepper, sweet spice, black olive and coffee bean. Subtly structured, lively, there’s great presence on the palate and a fruity, peppery finish.

Suggested Food Pairing:  Grilled lamb chops or a rare steak would be a good match. Given the War of 1812 theme, we couldn’t resist sharing the ‘Going into Battle Lamb Stew’ recipe!

Cellaring:  Enjoy now or cellar 3-5 years.

Neufeld Vineyard Meritage 2010 VQA, $29.95

The grape varieties for this intense classic blend (the Cabernets and Merlot) were aged separately in seasoned and neutral French and American oak (80/20) for 10 months, blended, then finished a further 6 months in oak.

Savvy Sommelier Tasting Notes:  Garnet hued, this outstanding blend offers layered aromas and flavours. Think dark fruit, smoke, cedar, vanilla and dried herbs. Dry, full bodied, smooth and round in texture, yet firmly structured, this wine is rich with mouthfilling dark berries and cherries, garnished with hints of sweet spice, pepper, dark chocolate and balsamic. There’s great balance and integration, and a lasting finish tantalizing the palate with notes of dark toast and coffee bean.

Suggested Food Pairing: Serve this wine with rare red meats.

Cellaring:  Drinking well now, this wine will cellar 5 to 7 years.

~ RECIPES TO ENJOY WITH YOUR SAVVY SELECTIONS ~

With Palatine Hills Sauvignon Blanc …

Orzo Salad with Grilled Veggies & Shrimp

Food & Drink Magazine

Serves 4-6

Ingredients
1 red onion
2 zucchini, sliced lengthwise
1 red pepper, quartered
1 yellow pepper, quartered
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 lb jumbo raw shrimp, peeled & deveined
1 cup orzo pasta
3 Tbsp chopped fresh Italian parsley
1 clove garlic, mined
Pinch hot pepper flakes (or Tabasco sauce)
3 Tbsp white wine vinegar
2 Tbsp each chopped fresh mint & basil
Salt & pepper to taste

Method

  1. Cut onion into 6 wedges; place in a large bowl. Add zucchini, peppers & 2 Tbsp oil. Place on a greased grill over medium-high heat and grill, turning once, for about 10 minutes or until golden and tender-crisp. Remove to cutting board and when cool enough, chop into bite-size pieces & place in large bowl.
  2. Meanwhile, in a pot of boiling salted water, cook orzo for about 8 minutes or until tender but firm. Drain & rinse & drain. Then add to grilled veggies.
  3. Toss shrimp with 1 Tbsp oil, 1 Tbsp of parsley, garlic & hot pepper flakes. Place on greased grill over medium-high heat & grill, turning once, for about 5 minutes or until firm & pink. Add to bowl.
  4. Whisk together remaining oil & parsley, white wine vinegar, mint, basil, salt & pepper to taste. Pour over salad & toss to combine.

 

With Palatine Hills Cabernet Franc …

Going into Battle Lamb Stew

Lorin Cook, from San Jose Mercury News

Serves 6

Ingredients
2 Tbsp olive oil, or more as needed
6 slices bacon, diced
Salt & pepper to taste
½ cup flour
2 lb. boneless leg of lamb, trimmed & cut into 1” pieces
1 medium onion, sliced
8 oz. cremini mushrooms, quartered
2 cloves garlic, sliced
1 C red wine
8 oz. can tomato sauce
1 Tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp oregano
2 tsp horseradish mustard
6 small red potatoes, peeled
3 small carrots, cleaned & sliced
½ C cranberries
1 C dried plums

Method

  1. In a large Dutch oven, heat olive oil over medium heat, then cook diced bacon until almost crisp. Remove to plate, leaving bacon fat in pot.
  2. Combined flour, pepper, salt in large bowl. Add lamb & toss to coat.
  3. Add an additional tsp of oil, if needed, to the bacon fat, and brown the lamb on all sides. Add onion, mushrooms, garlic & wine.
  4. In a small mixing bowl, combine tomato sauce, brown sugar, oregano & mustard; stir well. Pour over stew. Bring liquid to a boil, reduce heat, cover & simmer for 1 ½ hours.
  5. Add cooked bacon, potatoes, carrots, cranberries & plums to the pot. Cover & simmer 2-3 hours more, or until tender. Serve on a bed of wild rice.



With Palatine Hills Meritage …

Grilled Sirloin of Beef

A Matter of Taste, Lucy Waverman & James Chatto

Serves 4

Ingredients
1 boneless sirloin steak (~3 lbs.), 2” thick, trimmed
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp dry seasoning rub

Dry Rub (combine ingredients):
1 Tbsp paprika
1 tsp chili powder
1 tsp dry mustard
1 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp kosher salt

Garnish:
1 bunch arugula, trimmed
1 C finely chopped red onions
1 ¼ C finely chopped parsley
1 Tbsp fleur de sel or kosher salt
1 Tbsp cracked peppercorns

Method

  1. Brush steak with oil on both sides & sprinkle rub over. Grill beef over high heat for 10 minutes. Turn and continue to grill for 5-10 minutes longer for medium-rare, or until steak reaches desired degree of doneness.
  2. Place steak on a carving board and let rest for 5 minutes. Carve steak against grain into thin slices.
  3. Fan beef slices on a serving platter over bed of arugula & sprinkle with onions, parsley, fleur de sel & peppercorns. Serve with grilled mushrooms & potatoes.

Cheers & Enjoy this month’s Savvy Selections!

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